A Autumn Notebook

I thought folks might enjoy a few glimpses of autumn near our home. The below images didn’t require travelling to distant places but instead reflect what was seen as nature spoke to us in the intimacy of our own “neighborhood”. Unlike the maple covered hillsides of Vermont, autumn in central Ohio, with it’s more subtle colors, speaks in a soft voice. Putting this post together I imagined a notebook where thoughts and impressions of the season would be written down and, pausing for a moment, contemplated.

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This path along the reservoir is walked many times during the year but only on one day did it look like this. 

Griggs Reservoir Park, (Donna)

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A quest for autumn migrants was momentary interrupted as we stopped to watch the bare branches of a Black Walnut “conduct the music of the sky”. (1)

Tree and clouds, Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park.

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In the canoe, fishing for over an hour without a bite, I started looking at the water’s autumn reflections. A unexpected catch.

Griggs Reservoir

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Something sacred, as if transported inside a gothic cathedral? Under a blue dome, we look through “panes” to colors beyond.

Griggs Reservoir

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On the water’s blank canvas of color, mallard art.

Griggs Reservoir

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Patterns in bark, leaves, and shadows, the endless allure of a Sycamore.

Griggs Reservoir Park

In the mystery, with their small voices, warblers made themselves known overhead.

Along the Scioto River, Griggs Reservoir Park.

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Just now, with the help of the faintest breeze, the water’s surface reinterprets.

Griggs Reservoir Park.

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With light and shadow the leaves of a mulberry play their tune.

Griggs Reservoir Park, (Donna).

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A quiet park road beckons us to travel into the magic of the moment 

Griggs Reservoir Park.

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Sculpted by the river, autumn graces the twisted shape of a tree at waters edge.

Scioto River, Griggs Reservoir Park.

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In defiance of the coming winter a Sycamore splashes the landscape with muted color.

Scioto River, Griggs Reservoir Park.

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With it’s own beauty, a leaf on the water’s surface takes us beyond what we think we know or perceive.

Griggs Reservoir

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A light rain enhances shape and color but brings with it a sense foreboding of what has been and what is to come.

Griggs Reservoir.

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The afternoon sun punctuates shoreline trees. We wish for it to not end.

Griggs Reservoir.

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Overhanging trees embrace the river with a warmth that betrays the coolness of the day.

Scioto River, Griggs Reservoir Park.

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Reflection on the water’s surface, an autumn impression.

Little Darby Creek, Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park.

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Sunny, not to cold, nice day for a picnic, but we’ve moved on.

Griggs Reservoir Park.

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An early morning hike graced with shafts of light and color.

Clear Creek Metro Park.

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Cold descends, days now short, and among dark shapes the few remaining leaves twinkle.

Hocking River, Clear Creek Metro Park.

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That one last leaf in the fall as winter’s cold grips the land has always been a romantic image for me. Perhaps it’s because although we should look forward to the promise of every season we should also never be too quick to let go.

“The Last Leaf”, Battelle Darby creek Metro Park.

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Thanks for stopping by.

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Note (1): The idea “conduct the music of the sky” was suggested to me by a friend when she looked at the photograph.

10 Comments on “A Autumn Notebook

  1. Beautiful post agaon !!! I’m dying to get a few photos of a loon or two. If you could ever hive me s lead as to when they are in the central ofio area I would be forever grateful. Have a great week. billb6208@yahoo.com
    614-415-6208;,,,,, billbairdphotograpy.com

    • Thanks Bill,

      In the spring, early April is a good time to start looking for loons as they migrate through, In the fall it can vary. I remember seeing a Red-throated Loon on Griggs Reservoir a few years ago around Dec 15th. Some posts (and very average loon pics) can be seen by entering “loon” in the search box at the top of the blog page. We get our best Common Loon shots at the Rifle River Rec Area, MI in July or August using a canoe or kayak. The canoe typically allows you to get a lot closer without disturbing them.

      Bob

  2. I love all these photos. You have a great eye for framing all this beauty in a way that captures simple juxtapositions and light. Thanks for sharing.

  3. Absolutely stunning images!! And all this beauty, without having to book a flight to a remote location. Ain’t we a bunch of lucky ducks?!

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