The Show

Recently we were flattered with an invitation to exhibit some of our photographs at the church we attend. The invitation was undoubtedly the result of this blog as well as various Facebook posts that friends and acquaintances have seen over the years. A friend commented that they might not be able to get over to the exhibit so the thought occurred that perhaps a post showing the pictures was in order. We hope you enjoy them.

.

Lilly Pads, Mike Roess Gold Head Branch State Park, FL.

.

Blackburnian Warbler, Magee Marsh, OH, (Donna).

.

Wild Geranium, Glenn Echo Park, OH.

.

Hummingbird Moth, Griggs Reservoir Park, OH, (Donna).

.

Leaf, Griggs Reservoir, OH.

.

Wood Duck, Griggs Reservoir, OH, (Donna).

.

Squiggle, Griggs Reservoir, OH

.

Prothonotary Warbler, Griggs Reservoir, (Donna).

.

Branches, Griggs Reservoir, OH.

.

Red Winged Blackbird, Griggs Reservoir Park, OH, (Donna).

.

Misty Morning, Devoe Lake, Rifle River Recreation Area, MI.

.

Spring Azure on Phlox, Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park, OH, (Donna).

.

Tree, Salt Fork State Park, OH.

.

Cedar Waxwings, Griggs Reservoir Park, OH, (Donna).

.

New Art Exhibit at First Unitarian Universalist Church of Columbus 93 W. Weisheimer Rd. Columbus, OH 43214-2544, “The Eye of the Beholder,” July 2- August 25. Join the artists for a reception: Sunday, July 14, 11:30-1pm. Food, conversation and photos.

.

Approach photography playfully, you’ll have more fun, and your photographs will speak with a new voice.  Thanks for stopping by.

Spring Wildflowers Along The Darby

Even for Ohio it’s been an unusually fitful spring, with a warm sunny day followed by one that is cool cloudy and blustery with maybe a little rain or light snow thrown in for good measure. On a recent sunny day we decided to check out the wildflowers along a “new to us” trail that is accessed off Gardner Rd. in Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park. We were not disappointed as we walked through a wonderful arboretum of nature’s spring.

.

Phlox, Big Darby Creek Metro Park.

The subtle beauty of Large Flowered Bellwort. Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park.

Toadshade Trillium as a buttercup competes for our interest, Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park.

A Spring Beauty gets pollenated, Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park, (Donna).

Jacobs Ladder, Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park, (Donna).

Flowering tree, (Donna).

Large-flower Trillium, Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park.

Large-flowered Bellwort, Big Darby Creek Metro Park.

White Trout Lilies, Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park.

A beautiful example of a Toadshade Trillium, Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park.

A shaft of light illuminates the beauty of a White Trout Lily, Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park.

A Spring Azure visits flowering Phlox, Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park, (Donna).

Flowering cherry, Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park, (Donna).

Very blue Spring Beauties, Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park, (Donna).

Virginia Bluebells were very common, Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park.

Hispid Buttercup, Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park.

Purple Cress, Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park.

Large Flowered Trillium, Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park.

With an open forest canopy this trout lily celebrates the warm spring sun, Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park, (Donna).

.

Even with wildflowers to enchant it’s difficult not to notice other things.

In the midst of their nest building activities Blue Jays are hard to ignore, Griggs Reservoir Park, (Donna).

A Chipping Sparrow with it’s beautiful rufus crown catches our eye, Griggs Reservoir Park.

Feathers sparkling in the sun a Starling investigates a nesting cavity, Griggs Reservoir Park.

This time of year along roadside ditches, rivers, and lakes Red-winged Blackbirds are everywhere, Griggs Reservoir Park.

Less noticeable than their male counterpart the female Red-winged Blackbirds have arrived in central Ohio, Griggs Reservoir Park, (Donna).

.

They seemed to be getting along just fine .   .   .

Tree Swallows, Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park.

and then .   .   .

Just what they were communicating remains a mystery, (Donna).

.

The Yellow-rumped warblers continue to be a common site at Griggs Reservoir Park.

Female Yellow-rumped Warbler, Griggs Reservoir Park.

Kingbird, our first sighting of the year at Griggs Reservoir Park, (Donna).

A Palm Warbler along the shore of Griggs Reservoir.

Another look.

.

For nature lovers in central Ohio that have never visited Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park, do so, this quietist of the Columbus metro area metro parks is one of our favorites. In just a few days we’ve seen a noticeable increase in the green of the forest canopy so the days of spring wildflowers are fleeting. In the last few days there have been reports of  an increase of warbler migrants moving though the area so in the near term we will not run out of things to enchant.

.

Thanks for stopped by.

.

Emergent Buckeye leaves.

Spring Takes Flight at Prairie Oaks

We hadn’t been to Prairie Oaks for a while so we thought we’d head over to what is one of Columbus’s nicer metro parks and see how spring was progressing.  The day was breezy and cool so we weren’t sure what we’d find. Often the birds stay put on such days making locating them a challenge. But the sun did pop through the clouds periodically, and when it did, the birds, as if on cue, became more active. On this day, as often seems to be the case, the most magical event happened near the end of our adventure just as we arriving back at the parking lot after five miles of walking, looking. and then walking some more.

.

P1020046use

A spring creek flows through the park on it’s way to the river.

 .

We hadn’t gone very far when a few birds appeared to greet us.

IMG_7958use

White-throated Sparrow

IMG_7964use (2)

A Tree Swallow takes a break.

IMG_7974use (2)

A Yellow-throated Warbler not cooperating for the photographer.

 .

Further on my wife noticed some Dryad’s saddle. The time of year and recent rains all had contributed to a bumper crop.

Pheasant back 10 Trio underneath best 2 Prairie Oaks   csb1 (2)

Dryad’s Saddle, (Donna)

P1020108use

Dryad’s Saddle. The one at the top is just emerging.

Pheasant Back 4 under and over close-up 1 042715 Prairie   Oaks cp1 (2)

In full bloom, (Donna)

 .

While it’s just a few miles from Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park, the diversity of spring wildflowers at Prairie Oaks is not as great, but the flowers are beautiful just the same.

P1020126use

Golden Ragwort

P1020124use

Large-flowered Bellwort

P1020119use

Wild Geranium

P1020117use

Spring Beauty

P1020055use

Toadshade Trillium

IMG_8023use

Toadshade Trillium

IMG_8021

It was an extensive patch.

 .

Where there are wildflower you can count on seeing other things.

Spring Azure 9 wings closed best 1 042715 Prairie Oaks   cp1 (2)

A tiny Spring Azure, (Donna)

Spring Azure 5 close-up on violet 1 042715 Prairie Oaks   cp1

As if to mimic the flower. A great shot by my wife of a butterfly that’s very difficult to get a photo of with wings open. Perhaps the warm sun and cool air helped.

P1020102use

A Bumble Bee heads for Virginia Bluebells.

P1020101use

On final approach

P1020100use

Flaps down!

P1020064use

Touchdown!

     .

As we continued our exploration we were fortunate to see a few of our other feathered friends.

IMG_7988use (2)

Eastern Towhee

IMG_8011use

Yellow Warbler

IMG_8006

Take two. Okay, I couldn’t help it. The bird was so cute!

 .

The Big Darby flows through Prairie Oaks Metro Park.

P1020109use

During high water the soil is scoured from around the roots of this Sycamore tree.

P1020104

The Big Darby.

  .

Many of the turtles we come across seem to have a very acute awareness of their surroundings making them deceptively hard to photograph. They usually slide off the log and disappear under the water’s surface just as we get ready to click the shutter. But not this time.

IMG_8024use

Red Eared Slider

IMG_8028use (2)

Painted Turtle

Turtles Trio on log 042715 Prairie Oaks cp1 (2)

The group, (Donna)

 .

Spring nurseries for frogs and other living things surrounded by luminescent green.

P1020051

My wife checks out one of a number of spring nurseries.

P1020106

Frog heaven.

 .

At the end of our walk, not a hundred yards from our car, we observed a group of Killdeer (males?)  making quite a fuss.

IMG_8036use

A meeting of the Killdeer.

.

The discussion was loud and went on for quite awhile.

IMG_8047use

One seems to have made his point and wants to move on.

.

.   .   .   but then as if tired of the their earth bound or perhaps just to celebrate the day,

.   .   .  they took flight.

Kildeer group 9 in flight best ever 1 042715 Prairie Oaks   cp1

Killdeer in flight, (Donna)

Kildeer Group 9 in flight best 2 042715 Prairie Oaks   cp1

Revealing a beauty not seen until they were in the air. (Donna).

IMG_8064use

.   .   .   as a straggler tries to catch up.

 .

Thanks for stopping by.

Contrasts and Abundance

This spring I’ve been struck by a couple of things. First, how we visually perceive some plants and animals to be very beautiful and others pretty ugly  if not repugnant. It certainly seems as though our brains are hardwired to discriminate, certainly not a new idea. In our distant past, were attractive things usually better to eat? Probably not. In many cases it may just be the subconscious association with attractive or repugnant things closer to home. Theories abound! As a result of many hours spent tromping through the woods I’ve developed an interest in lichens and fungi. However, I’d be the first to admit that most of the time their beauty doesn’t come close to that of even an average wildflower.

Secondly, along with Ohio’s biodiversity, which has always been a fascination, I’m in awe when I think about the sheer amount of life that comes into being every spring and summer in our northern latitudes. Forget about animals and insects for a moment and just think about everything else. Not too long ago while walking through some very lush spring woods, undoubtedly made more so by recent heavy rains, fresh translucent green was everywhere. We were in a completely different place than that which existed just a few weeks earlier when trees were bare and the ground largely devoid of life. What would we find if we could weigh the woods before and after? Interesting to think about. Pursuing this thought, and equally fascinating, is the amount of water that takes up residence in green living things this time of year and how that interacts with the rest of our environment.

So below are pictures taken around our yard and during recent walks along Griggs Reservoir. A celebration of that life, some beautiful and some not so much.

A Flicker keeps it’s distance:

Flicker 3460

Northern Flicker being elusive.

Flicker 3443

Northern Flicker a little closer in better light.

.

A heron gets a mid-morning snack:

Great Blue 1 3471

Great Blue Heron fishing.

Great Blue 2 053014 Griggs cp1

Is it a hit or a miss? (Donna)

Great Blue 4 053014 Griggs cp1

Success! A bite size snack. Is that heron swimming? (Donna)

Great Blue 8 053014 Griggs cp1

Drying off. (Donna)

Great Blue 6 053014 Griggs cp1

Maybe they’re bigger on the other side of the reservoir. (Donna)

Great Blue 9 053014 Griggs cp1

Just enough energy in that snack for a flight across the lake. (Donna)

Great Blue 10 053014 Griggs cp1

Graceful! (Donna)

.

Map Turtles and Red-eared Sliders take advantage of the morning sun.

Red-eared Sliders 3440

Red-eared Slider island.

Map Turtles 3439

Map Turtles enjoying the sun.

.

I’m not sure even a mother could love this little guy:

Dead Man's Finger's 6721

Dead Man’s Finger’s

Flowering Dead Mans Finger's but not sure 6715

Could be the flowering portion of Dead Man’s Fingers but not sure

.

This common lichen is a little easier on the eyes:

Candelaria concolor 6713

Candelaria concolor

.

Fortunately we could take refuge in other sights:

Early Meadow Rue 3459

Early Meadow Rue

Common Foxglove 3449

Common Foxglove

Canada Anemone 3462

Canada Anemone

Red Clover 3447

Red Clover

Spring Azure 3456

Spring Azure, a very small butterfly.

View along the shore:

Cove Reflections 1 053014 Griggs fix

Griggs Reservoir cove, (Donna)

.

Thanks for stopping by.

 

Londonsenior

The life of an elderly Londoner and her travels.

Tootlepedal's Blog

A look at life in the borders

Eloquent Images by Gary Hart

Insight, information, and inspiration for the inquisitive nature photographer

gordoneaglesham

The Wildlife in Nature

Through Open Lens

Home of Lukas Kondraciuk Photography

My Best Short Nature Poems

Ellen Grace Olinger

through the luminary lens

The sun is the great luminary of all life - Frank Lloyd Wright

talainsphotographyblog

Nature photography

Mike Powell

My journey through photography

The Prairie Ecologist

Essays, photos, and discussion about prairie ecology, restoration, and management

Lightscapes Nature Photography Blog

Kerry Mark Leibowitz's musings on the wonderful world of nature photography

Montana Outdoors

A weblog dedicated to the world outside the cities.

Cat Tales

Mike and Lori adrift

New Hampshire Garden Solutions

Exploring Nature in New Hampshire

Jessica's Nature Blog

https://natureinfocus.blog

Quiet Solo Pursuits

My adventures in the woods, streams, rivers, fields, and lakes of Michigan

Seasons Flow

Everything flows, nothing stands still. (Heraclitus)