Maine Musings

Every couple of years we travel to the coast of Maine. It always seems like our stay is too short. The below images around Stonington as well as Mt Dessert Island are in celebration of our recent visit. For photographers enchanted by rugged natural beauty the coast of Maine offers endless photographic opportunities. As if the natural beauty wasn’t enough, exploring the trails of Acadia National Park often treats one’s senses to the fragrance of salt air and balsam. Not something we get to enjoy in Ohio. Our too brief stop in Stonington left us feeling that our next visit will have to encompass more than just a few hours and there are always more places to see and explore on Mt Dessert Island. Plenty of reasons to return.

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Landscapes:

Along Ship Harbor Trail, Mt Desert Island, (Donna).

Friendship Sloop, Southwest Harbor.

Granite along Ship Harbor Trail.

Harbor Scene, Rockport.

The narrows, Ship Harbor Trail.

Dingy, Southwest Harbor.

 

Ocean walk, Bar Harbor.

Ship Harbor Trail.

Stonington chair.

Balanced rock. This very large glacial erratic left behind by the receding glaciers 10,000 years ago has fascinated Bar Harbor visitors for years.

Undated picture of balanced rock perhaps from the early 1900’s.

Waiting for the boat, Bar Harbor.

Northeast Harbor.

Lobster boats, Stonington.

Lobster pound, Southwest Harbor.

Stonington waterfront.

Stonington cat.

Along the Ocean Path, Acadia National Park. This is one of the best trails for seascapes but getting a people free picture can be a challenge.

Gulls and boats, Southwest Harbor.

A view of Northeast Harbor from Thuya Gardens.

Margaret Todd off Bar Harbor.

Rainy afternoon, Bar Harbor.

Ocean Path.

Harbor scene, Bar Harbor.

Incoming wave, Ocean Path.

Peapod, Stonington.

Ocean Path.

Lobster boats, Bar Harbor.

Dories, Stonington.

Harbor scene, Southwest Harbor.

Ebbing tide, Stonington.

Unloading the catch, Stonington.

Salt air and balsam along the Ocean Path.

Kim’s Pride, Stonington.

Window, Southwest Harbor.

Friends, Northeast Harbor.

Boat lift, Stonington.

Reflection, Northeast Harbor.

Windows, Stonington.

Cliff along Ocean Path, Acadia National Park.

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Nature:

We saw several non-breeding Black Guillemots as we explored the coves and harbors.

Calico Asters, (Donna).

Female Common Eider with small crab, (Donna).

Colorful fungi, (Donna).

Greater Yellowlegs, (Donna).

Red Squirrel cuteness, Bar Harbor.

Gull with crab at low tide, (Donna).

Ruby-throated Hummingbird, Thuya Gardens, (Donna).

Ruby-throated Hummingbird, (Donna).

As we hiked a trail in Thuya Gardens, this salamander just avoided my foot.

American Lady, Thuya Gardens, (Donna).

Another view.

Wild Rose, found along many of the ocean side trails.

Asters

As the tide goes out there’s the enchanting world of tide pools to explore, Wonderland Trail, Acadia National Park.

Tide pool detail, (Donna).

Tide pool.

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We hope you enjoyed this brief interlude from our usual central Ohio posts. For a moment this morning as we walking along Griggs Reservoir in the misty rain, except for the lack of salt air, it was hard not to imagine we were back in Maine. Thanks for stopping by.


Clifton Gorge Celebrates Spring

A couple of times a year, usually in the spring and fall we get together with friends for a hike from Clifton to Yellow Springs and back. Yellow Springs turns out to be a great place for lunch with a number of excellent small restaurants and delis. The hike wanders through Clifton Gorge Nature PreserveJohn Bryan State Park, and finally Glen Helen Nature Preserve allowing us to enjoy a truly unique Ohio landscape. In the spring the quantity and diversity of wildflowers is truly amazing. The hike usually adds up to about ten miles so it necessitates compromises in the camera equipment we use. No heavy DSLR bird cameras here.  However, should you choose to bring more serious equipment or just not feel up to a long hike, there are many shorter options that still allow one to enjoy the natural beauty.

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Leaving Clifton the hike starts out overlooking a narrow stretch of the Little Miami River.

Clifton Gorge Nature Preserve

In the spring numerous small streams feed the Little Miami.

By no means the narrowest portion of the gorge it does give one an idea of what it is like.

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Continuing to follow the river it wasn’t long before we saw our first trillium.

Large-flowered Trillium with a hint of pink.

A nice group.

They covered the hillside, Clifton Gorge Nature Preserve.

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In the mix there were other trilliums to enjoy.

Toadshade Trillium

Another view, (Donna).

Drooping Trillium. Also known as Bent Trillium.

Drooping Trillium

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There were also “non-flower” things to see.

Dryad’s Saddle

This Redback salamander was crossing the road so we decided to place him in a safer location. This salamander can actually be one of two colors: “redback” or “leadback.” In its redback phase it has a reddish stripe that runs down its back from the base of its head to the tail. Found throughout Ohio, it is most often seen in early spring beneath rocks and logs, especially in floodplains. It is entirely land-dwelling and usually will not go to water even to breed. Ref: ODNR.

Morel Mushroom, (Donna).

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As we made our way downstream the river started to widen.

The Little Miami

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.   .   .  and then pool before becoming a river once again.

Blue Hole

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There was never a place where we couldn’t see a wildflower.

Virginia Bluebells

Bloodroot

Large-flowered Bellwort was everywhere.

A closer look.

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There wasn’t always a bridge when we needed one. Fortunately on this particular day the river level wasn’t too high.

In John Bryant SP.

Green was still mostly restricted to the forest floor, Glen Helen Nature Preserve.

View from the bridge over the falls on Yellow Springs Creek, Glen Helen Nature Preserve.

A stream feeds Yellow Springs Creek.

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Just when you thought you’ve seen all the flowers   .   .   .

Rue Anemone, (Donna)

Squirrel Corn, It’s roots are yellow tubers that somewhat resemble kernals of corn. This fact, along with squirrels digging it up for food, gave rise to the name. (taken from Wildflowers of Ohio by Robert L Henn)

Squirrel Corn, a closer look, (Donna).

Wild Ginger, (Donna). The root stalks have a ginger scent and taste. American settlers boiled the root stalks with sugar to make candy. Not the same as the true Ginger spice which is derived from a tropical plant. (taken from Wildflowers of Ohio -Robert L. Henn

Blue Phlox or Wild Sweet William, (Donna).

Wild Geranium was just coming along! Also known as Crane’s Bill. (Donna).

Golden Ragwort, (Donna).

Marsh Marigold, (Donna).

Yellow Trout Lilies, (Donna)

Surrounded by Chickweed the trout lilies peek through, (Donna).

Getting down and dirty.

Early Meadow Rue, (Donna).

Hepatica, (Donna).

Dwarf Larkspur

Dwarf Larkspur

How many different wildflowers can you spot in this photo?

Spring Beauty, (Donna).

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Sometimes we’re left feeling as though life’s magic is slipping away and there are no longer any miracles to celebrate. That’s when we might want to consider taking a walk in the spring woods.

 

Rue Anemone stands as a lone sentinel over the Little Miami.

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Thanks for stopping by.

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XXX

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Should you wish, prints from various posts may be purchased at Purchase a Photo.

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