Autumn Contemplation

Most of the time it’s nice to have a central theme. However, for the most part, this post just meanders through early autumn and celebrates the time of year in some of our central Ohio parks. I continue to enjoy shooting a portion of my photos with a Sony A7, adapter, and legacy Canon FD lenses. It’s nice to have so much control over depth of field. My wife is ever on the lookout for things small, be it insects or details that charm in the fall foliage.

The Big Darby, Prairie Oaks Metro Park.

.

Monarchs continue to work their way south while a few late summer buckeyes, having made their way to central Ohio, enchant. Painted Ladies and Viceroys also continue to be seen. Are Painted Ladies more beautiful with wings closed or open?

Viceroy, (Donna)

Take 2.

Buckeye, Griggs Reservoir Park, (Donna).

Painted Lady, Prairie Oaks Metro Park.

Take 2, (Donna).

Eastern-tailed Blue, Griggs Reservoir Park, (Donna).

<<<>>>

Leaves continue to grace a long fallen Sycamore along the Scioto River below Griggs Dam.

<<<>>>

There still may be time before the first hard frost results in an abrupt end to most of the current insect activity. Katydids and crickets that so willingly provide the late summer soundtrack for our outdoor adventures will fall silent. The purpose of their time here will emerge next spring and take up the charge as the dance of death and life continues. Meanwhile as autumn moves on we continue to enjoy their life.

Widow Skimmer, Prairie Oaks Metro Park.

Bees on Nodding Bur-marigold, Griggs Reservoir Park, (Donna).

Male Eastern Pondhawk, Prairie Oaks Metro Park, (Donna).

Black and Yellow Garden Spider, the bee managed to allude the spiders web, Griggs Reservoir Park, (Donna).

Scarlet and Green Leaf Hopper, Griggs Reservoir Park, (Donna).

Long Horned Beetle, not sure which one, Griggs reservoir park, (Donna).

Grasshopper, Griggs Reservoir Park, (Donna).

<<<>>>

The Scioto River.

<<<>>>

Recently we were fascinated by an immature Red-tailed Hawk that posed to have it’s picture taken and then decided to fly into a nearby tree in an attempt to extract a meal from a squirrels nest. It did succeed in arousing the occupants but standing on top of the nest it was no match for them as they circled and sprang from branch to branch until they were out of harms way.

Red-tailed Hawk, Griggs Reservoir Park.

Come on out of there, I just went to play, honest!

<<<>>>

A hint of autumn, Griggs Reservoir.

<<<>>>

With the days now much shorter, other creatures seem to sense that colder weather is just around the corner as they enjoy the morning sun or in the case of the squirrels and chipmunks busy themselves collecting stores for winter.

Painted Turtle, Prairie Oaks Metro Park.

Chipmunk with acorn, Griggs reservoir Park, (Donna).

Red Squirrel, Griggs Reservoir Park, (Donna).

Groundhog, Griggs Reservoir Park, (Donna).

<<<>>>

A favorite tree.

<<<>>>

Asters and other late summer flowers now compete with leaves for the seasons beauty.

Neighbors

Evening Primrose, Griggs Reservoir Park, (Donna).

The Scioto River pays tribute to autumn.

The river peeks through windblown leaves as they struggle to hang on, Griggs Reservoir Park.

In the autumn breeze milkweed seeds prepare to take flight, Prairie Oaks Metro Park.

Reflections.

Virginia Creeper, Griggs Reservoir.

Sunflowers, Griggs Reservoir Park, (Donna).

Color along Griggs Reservoir.

Changing leaves, Griggs Reservoir Park, (Donna).

Sycamore bark, Griggs Reservoir Park.

Red, yellow, green, Griggs Reservoir Park, (Donna).

Suspended color along the Scioto River.

<<<>>>

Rocks often washed by the river’s high water are now covered with the litter of trees.

<<<>>>

We often journey into nature equipped with expectations, perhaps it’s seeing a certain bird, insect, or wildflower, but the key to the magic may be to let go, allowing each day, each season, to speak in it’s own voice.

Autumn from the canoe, Griggs Reservoir.

.

Thanks for stopping by.

.

XXX

.

Should you wish prints from various posts may be purchased at Purchase a Photo. If you don’t find it on the link drop us a line.

An Early Autumn Paddle

Early autumn is one of our favorite times of the year. There are usually fewer people on the trails, rivers, and lakes as many have moved on to other things; football games, school, etc. September often has a period 0f sunny windless days making time spent in the canoe a pure joy. The landscape still mostly green is accented by the brilliant reds and yellows of a few trees determined to get a head start on fall making it all the more striking.

A small fish surfaces disturbing an early autumn reflection.

.

Realizing that opportunities for comfortable paddling are starting to slip away, a few days ago we decided to paddle the north end Alum Creek Reservoir into Alum Creek with the hope of seeing fall warblers as we made our way along the shore.

.

At first the sun struggled to burn off an early morning fog.

The fog begins to lift not long after we start paddling.

.

But when it did .   .   .

The far shore erupts in color.

.

A closer look revealed that the fog and the soft sunlight was giving a jewel like quality to spider webs too numerous to count.

Spider webs and autumn leaves.

Graceful designs.

Different colors.

What could I make with my own hands that would be any more beautiful?

.

As we continued on close to shore, color frames the reservoir.

Just a few feet from shore offered some unique perspectives, (Donna).

.

On this particular day the flowers seen were mostly those right along the shore and seemed to be thriving in that location.

Turtlehead

Sunflower

Beggars Ticks, very small flower.

False Daisy, also very small.

Broad-leaved Arrowhead.

A closer look.

Swamp Smartweed, (Donna).

.

On the quiet surface the canoe seemed to glide forever.

Calm

Color, (Donna).

.

Pullouts offer an opportunity to explore areas along the water and it usually doesn’t take my wife long to find interesting insects.

Gladiator Katydid, (Donna).

Weevil, Lixus iridis, a large weevil with a flat oval body, and a pointed shield. Completely covered in short hairs, yellow to brown, sometimes fading to grey. Thick legs and antennae. Habitat is wetland or close to water.

.

Painted turtles greeted us as we paddled.

Unlike many turtles that sense our approach while we’re still quite far away resulting in a quick slide or plop into the water, Painted Turtles appear to enjoy having their picture taken, (Donna).

Do the turtles sense that the good times of summer are about to end? (Donna).

.

While few warblers were seen and none were photographed, Ospreys were heard overhead, and we were fortunate to see some of the other usual suspects.

A Green Heron stalks it’s prey.

Time to straighten things up, Great Blue Heron.

We lost count of the number of Double-crested Cormorants seen, (Donna).

Belted Kingfisher, (Donna).

.

After about four miles we arrive at a gravel bar on Alum Creek that usually marks the most northern point of our paddle unless we feel like dragging the canoe more than paddling it.

A lone rock marks the end of the paddle north and our lunch stop.

A great spot for lunch!

.   .   .   and a scenic pullout.

.

Autumn reminds us, perhaps more than any other season, that nothing lasts. It reminds us to stop being passively entertained and instead to entertain and enrich ourselves, to venture out into disappointment and discovery, to experience being part of something larger, and to be alive.

.

Thanks for stopping by.

.

XXX

.

Should you wish prints from various posts may be purchased at Purchase a Photo. If you don’t find it on the link drop us a line.

A Few Days Along The Rifle River

Last week we spent a few days in Michigan in the Rifle River Recreation Area not far from the town of West Branch on the northeast side of the lower peninsula. With a number of excellent hiking trails, and lakes that don’t allow motors, it’s an excellent place for nature viewing. The lack of boat generated wakes on Devoe Lake means that Loons nest there. To the best of our knowledge it’s the closest location from central Ohio where nesting Loons can be seen. There are also Bald Eagles, Osprey as well as other birds to enjoy. When out exploring one is also treated to dragonflies and butterflies, as well as a number wildflowers not seen in central Ohio. Not far from the park is the AuSable River and the adjacent National Forest create even more opportunities for paddling and outdoor adventure.

Overlooking Grousehaven Lake, early morning.

<<<>>>

We could spend hours watching loons. A quiet paddle on Devoe Lake allows one to observe them as they go about their day.

Adult Common Loon, Devoe Lake

In the middle of preening this adult seems to be sneaking a peek.

Testing it’s wings, (Donna).

The young are almost always begging for food.

The adult comes through. How does a bird as big as a loon chase down such a small fish under water?

One more picture.

<<<>>>

A view from the canoe.

Devoe Lake

<<<>>>

Bald Eagles are sometimes seen flying overhead as we observe the loons with their young. If they get too close the adult loons create quite a commotion!

A Bald Eagle looks over Devoe Lake.

Bald Eagle, Load Pond, AuSable river.

Take 3, (Donna).

Other birds of prey also frequent the area.

An Osprey takes a break along the shoreline of Devoe Lake, (Donna).

<<<>>>

Early morning solitude near our campsite.

Looking across the Jewett Lake.

<<<>>>

Most birds were seen from the canoe as we made our way along the shoreline of Devoe and Grebe Lakes, as well as Loud Pond on the Au Sable River.

Baltimore Oriole, Devoe Lake.

A Kingbird, the dragonflies worst enemy, waits for it’s next meal along the shore of Devoe Lake.

Three Caspian Terns circled overhead, occasionally landing, as we made our way back to our launch site on wind swept Loud Pond. A few reasonable sharp images were obtained.

Trumpeter Swans, Grebe Lake.

A Kingfisher actually stays put long enough for a “usable” picture, Devoe Lake.

A Green Heron is caught preening, Devoe Lake, (Donna).

Spotted Sandpiper, Loud Pond.

<<<>>>

While hiking, especially this time of year, birds usually give way to the wildflowers and interesting types of fungus.

Coral fungus near our campsite.

Turtlehead.

Bridge across the Rifle River.

Grass of Parnassus

Ontario Lobelia

An exotic looking mushroom near our campsite.

Knapweed, (ID c/o “NH Garden Solutions”)

Indian Pipe

Donna enjoying the ferns.

Doll’s Eyes

Asters

Broad-leaved Arrowhead

Great Blue Lobelia.

Fringed Loosestrife, (Donna).

Just after this picture was taken this tree got a big hug!

Hawkweed.

Cardinal Flower was quiet common in the wet areas of the park.

Mushroom family near our campsite, (Donna).

Picture Plant and flower. Tough to get a good picture of.

An attractive group of mushrooms along the trail.

An attractive flower that has eluded identification. Some type of lobelia?

St. John’s Wort, (Donna).

Another example of some of the interesting fungi seen, (Donna).

Virgin’s Bower. (ID c/o “NH Garden Solutions”)

<<<>>>

Dragonflies, damselflies, and butterflies were seen as we enjoyed the wildflowers included one butterfly not typically seen in central Ohio.

Ruby Meadowhawk, (Donna).

The very small American Copper, not a butterfly we’ve seen in central Ohio, (Donna).

Monarchs mating.

Pelecinid Wasp

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, (Donna).

Mating Robber Flies. Robber flies are one of the insect worlds more ferocious looking subjects. An appearance that is not unwarranted!

Mating Spreadwings, (Donna).

Bad-Wing Moths mating.

Spotted Spreadwing, (Donna).

Katydid.

Red-spotted Purple, (Donna).

Vesper Bluet, (Donna).

Dragon Hunter, (Donna).

A Crab Spider ambushes a bee, (Donna).

Canada Darner

Common Wood-Nymph on Spiked Blazing-star.

Appalachian Brown, (Donna).

Great Spangled Fritillary, (Donna).

<<<>>>

A sense of place.

The Rifle River as it flows through the park.

Exploring a quiet backwater.

The quiet shoreline of Loud Pond, the AuSable River.

<<<>>>

Shall we go for a hike or paddle? The decision is often made based on the weather conditions. Wind and choppy water make canoe photography with long lenses almost impossible. However, should conditions permit we’re usually not disappointed be the flowers seen as we paddle!

Scaup Lake, Rifle River Rec Area.

Pickerel Weed and Lilly Pads, Grebe Lake.

Pickerel Weed, Grebe Lake.

American White Water Lily, Grebe Lake.

A closer look.

Meadow Sweet, (ID c/o “NH Garden Solutions”),  (Donna).

Swamp Smartweed

Water Shield, (ID c/o “NH Garden Solutions”), (Donna).

Yellow Pond Lily, (Donna).

Burr Reed, (ID c/o “NH Garden Solutions”), (Donna).

<<<>>>

Sometimes when hiking you don’t have to look real close to be overwhelmed by the beauty.

Gamble Creek, Class 1 trout stream, Rifle River Rec Area.

<<<>>>

No post would be complete without touching on some of the reptiles and amphibians seen. Seeing the skink was a surprise.

Bullfrog.

Wood Frog.

Painted Turtle

Five-lined Skink.

Garter Snake.

<<<>>>

While fishing along the Au Sable River upstream of Loud Pond, a Mink is sighted!

A Mink scurries along the bank, (Donna).

Au Sable River, catch and release, Small Mouth Bass. The river is one of the best Small Mouth Bass fisheries in the Midwest.

<<<>>>

We spend a lot of time looking and exploring but sometimes there’s a lot to be said for just being there.

The end of the day, Devoe Lake.

.

We hope you’ve enjoyed this very incomplete sample of things that can be seen and experienced in the Rifle River Recreation Area.

The beauty is, the more time spent in nature the more you will see, the more you see the more you will want to understand and soon you’ll be carried away by the wonder and magic of it all.

As always thanks for stopping by!

.

<<<>>>

Should you wish, prints from various posts may be purchased at Purchase a Photo. If you don’t find it on the link drop us a line.

The Magic World Of The Very Small

The last few days found us paddling Griggs Reservoir. This time of year we always hope that staying close to the shoreline will result in warbler sightings and perhaps a few pictures. With warblers and other migrants moving through it’s a good time of year. In recent days on the reservoir we’ve even seen Mink along the banks and while walking just south of the dam my wife caught the tail end of a Bald Eagle as it flew overhead.

 

p1380316

Bald Eagle over the Scioto River just below Griggs Reservoir, (Donna)

.

A number of immature Black-crowned Night Herons have also been seen, encouraging because of our recent discovery of one that had met it’s demise at the business end of a abandoned fishing line.

p1130791

Immature Black-crowned Night Heron, Griggs Reservoir.

.

Other things were also seen as we made our way along the shore.

bird-3-great-blue-heron-in-flight-1-lr-1-092016-griggs-paddle-cp1

A Great Blue Heron takes flight, Griggs Reservoir, (Donna)

img_6086

Two Wood Ducks seemingly amused by a Painted Turtle or is it the other way around, Griggs reservoir.

img_6095

A Red-tailed Hawk looks on as we head north along the west shore of the reservoir.

p1370799

Painted Turtles enjoy posing for the camera much more than some of the other species we encounter, (Donna)

p1010971s

A female Kingfisher actually poses for the camera, Griggs Reservoir.

.

Walking Griggs Park has been more productive for seeing as well as photographing warblers and other small birds mostly because of the difficulty in controlling and positioning the canoe in the pursuit of small active birds.

 

img_6193

A male Bluebird doing what bluebirds do best, Griggs Park.

 

img_6176

A male Cardinal, beautiful in the morning sun, Griggs Park.

img_6047

Eastern Phoebe, Griggs Park.

 

img_6153

Black-throated Green Warbler, Griggs Park.

 

 

p1380253

Another view, (Donna)

img_6167

Carolina Wren sings it’s heart out.

img_6151

Chipping Sparrow, Griggs Park.

.

If the warblers aren’t cooperating there may be a butterfly, not always rare, but one we’ve not noticed before.

p1380151

Checkered Skipper, Griggs Park, (Donna)

.

Fishing is also getting better as the weather cools with time taken off between casts to do a little house keeping along the shore. What can I say, it’s always there, but as those who read this blog already know, it makes me feel better to pick it up.

imgp0009-2

Another nice Smallmouth Bass, Griggs Reservoir

p1130800-2

Unlike fish that are always returned to the water, the trash covering the bottom of the canoe is not “Catch and Release”!

.

But recently real magic was discovered within the world of the very small when we spotted countless damselflies mating on fallen autumn leaves floating on the reservoir’s calm surface as we paddled back to our launch site during the warmth of the day. We’d never seen anything like that before.

damselflies-2-artistic-2-closer-1-best-1-092016-griggs-paddle-cp1

In the warming late morning sun Dusky Dancer were on every leaf, (Donna)

p1130755

The bigger the leaf the more damselflies. Sometimes, as we got close, they would swarm over the  canoe.

.

That’s about it for this post. For us living in northern regions autumn is a great time to be out in nature. A feeling borne from the knowledge that this fleeting time will not last. Thanks for stopping by.

dew-drop-crop

Dew Drop

xxx

Should you wish, various prints from this and other posts may be purchased at Purchase a Photo. and Donna’s 2017 Birds of Griggs Park calendar is available at Calendar.

 

A Late Spring Celebration of Nature

Whether paddling or walking our explorations in the last week or so have been very close to home in Griggs Park and the reservoir. We hardly feel deprived. As the pictures below will attest, especially in the case of my wife, the closer you look the more you see.

.

Some of the flowers we are now seeing will continue to bloom for most of the summer. Others will not. Part of the ever changing scene.

Donna (13)

Ox-eye Daises, (Donna), FZ200.

Donna (26)

Hairy Ruellia, (Donna), FZ200.

Donna (35)

Rough-fruited Cinquefoil, (Donna) FZ200

P1000818

Northern Catalpa, Griggs Park, FZ200.

 

P1300886

Along the shore of Griggs Reservoir the Blue Flag Iris continues to enchant, (Donna), FZ200.

Donna (3)

Goats Beard, (Donna), FZ200.

Donna (29)

Mushrooms, (Donna), FZ200.

.

Some things seen have been unusual. Many thanks to New Hampshire Garden Solutions for help in identifying what was going on in the following pic, Elm Pouch Galls.

P1110388

Produced by aphids, Elm Pouch Galls rise from the upper leaf surface, Griggs Park, FZ200.

.

While we are still hearing them, many birds choose to peer at us from behind the leaf cover so my wife has directed more of her attention to more cooperative subjects.

 

Donna (7)

Peck’s Skipper, (Donna), FZ200.

Donna (14)

Zebulon Skipper, (Donna), FZ200

 

Donna (25)

Bronze Copper, (Donna), FZ200

Donna (24)

Top view.

Donna (28)

Clouded Sulfur with a friend, (Donna), FZ200.

 

Donna (21)

Black Swallowtail, Griggs Park, (Donna), FZ200.

P1000826

A busy bee, Griggs Park, Canon 3ti, 18-135.

Donna (17)

Eastern Pondhawk (F), (Donna), FZ200.

Donna (16)-2

Widow Skimmer (F), (Donna), FZ200.

.

Look even closer and you’ll see tiny insects with jewel like qualities.

P1300852

Stream Bluet, (Donna), FZ200.

P1300860

Stream Bluet (F)?, (Donna), FZ200.

P1300869

Powdered Dancer (M), (Donna), FZ200.

P1300872

Very small gold fly, (Donna), FZ200.

.

Thankfully not all of our feathered friends were in hiding.

 

P1110438 (2)

Male Bluebird, Griggs Park, FZ200.

P1110415 (2)

Kingbird, Griggs Park, FZ200.

 

P1000802

Robin, Griggs Park, ZS50.

P1000901 (2)

We haven’t had much luck getting a close pic so far this year but we did catch the male Baltimore Oriole along the Scioto below Griggs Dam,  ZS50.

IMG_1

What were these White-breasted Nuthatches doing? ZS50.

IMG_2

Fledglings! along the Scioto River below Griggs Dam.

IMG_5445

With so many beautiful Great Blue Herons along the reservoir so it hard to resist taking a picture, Canon 60D sigma 150-500.

P1000743 (2)

We watched this Great Blue Heron for some time as he struggled and went through all kinds of contortions but never did see him swallow the poor fish which by heron standards wasn’t all that large, ZS50.

P1000790 (2)

As we walk along park path, just overhead a Turkey Vulture sizes us up, “Still Moving, @?%#!!!”, ZS50

P1110390 (2)

Mother Mallard with baby along Griggs Reservoir, FZ200.

IMG_5455

An Osprey watches as we paddle by, north end of Griggs Reservoir, Canon 60D, sigma 150-500.

IMG_5431

A Red-tailed Hawk does likewise, Canon 60D, sigma 150-500.

.

And a few other creatures too.

 

IMG_1538cc

Sunfish, sometimes what a fish lacks in size it makes up for in beauty. This little fella went swimming right after the pic, Griggs Reservoir, Canon SD850.

P1000908 (2)

A turtle convention along the Scioto River below Griggs Dam, ZS50.

P1300829

Looking like somewhere in northern Michigan a deer crosses the Scioto north of Griggs Reservoir, (Donna), FZ200.

P1300884

Not seen as often as Map Turtles and Red-eared Sliders, we were excited to see two Painted Turtles enjoying the sun along the Griggs Reservoir shore, (Donna), FZ200.

.

Sometimes it’s good to just step back and admire it all from a distance.

P1110445

North end of Griggs reservoir, FZ200

.

Thanks for stopping by.

Late Summer at Prairie Oaks

The last few days we’ve spent some time at Prairie Oaks Metro Park looking for early migrating warblers that are now making their way south through central Ohio.  We’ve heard them, even seen them, but their constant movement and the leaf cover have foiled most attempts at pictures. However, as is usually the case, there were plenty of other things that capture our imagination.  The fact is, it’s also a great time of the year for insects, and with recent rains that includes the biting kind, the price of admission.

.

P1050012

Big Darby, Prairie Oaks Metro Park

.

As we walked, we couldn’t help but notice the abundance of wildflowers.

Yellow flowers Bouquet 1 best 1 090115 Prairie Oaks cp1

Jerusalem Artichoke, (also called sunroot, sunchoke, earth apple or topinambour), is a sunflower native to eastern North America. Cultivated widely across the temperate zone for its tuber, which is used as a root vegetable tasting something like an artichoke.

.

Virgin’s Bower has an attractive flower,

Virgin's Bower IMG_9100a

Virgin’s Bower

.

.   .   .   but it’s appearance after it goes to seed may be more fascinating.

Virgin's Bower gone to seed 083015 Prairie Oaks cp1

Virgin’s Bower gone to seed, (Donna)

.

P1050017

Great Blue Lobelia

.

P1040998 (2)

Evening Primrose

.

IMG_9099

Daisies

.

A wooded trail offered the opportunity to see fungi.

P1050015

Prairie Oaks Metro Park

.

.   .   .   and it’s not long before some is seen.

Wood Ear 2 closer 1 083015 Prairie Oaks cp1

Wood Ear, (Donna)

.

Unidentified Fungi P1160058

A type of polypore, (Donna)

.

Orange Mycena P1160066

Orange Mycena, (Donna)

.

Along the park’s meadows we were fortunate to see a few butterflies, Monarchs and a few other suspects.

P1050033use

Viceroy

.

P1160056

A small tussock moth caterpillar levitates.

.

Monarch (female) IMG_9103 (2)

Female Monarch

.

Black Swallowtail IMG_9169use

Black Swallowtail

.

Common Wood-nymph IMG_9110

Common Wood-nymph

.

The water’s edge of a park pond is home to frogs and turtles.

P1050030

Eastern (Northern) Cricket Frog, is one of North America’s smallest vertebrates, 0.75–1.50 in long. diet is small insects, including mosquitos. They are preyed upon by birds, fish, and other frogs. To escape predators, they are capable of leaping up to 3 feet in a single jump and are excellent swimmers. (from Wikipedia)

.

Red-eared Slider IMG_9155 (2)

Red-eared Slider. The box turtle shaped shell is interesting for an animal that spends much of it’s time in the water.

.

IMG_9184

Painted Turtle reflection.

.

Along with being excellent frog and turtle habitat, it’s a great place to see dragonflies.

P1040995

A pond at Prairie Oaks.

.

Widow Skimmer P1050025

Widow Skimmer

.

P1050035

Female Eastern Pondhawk.

.

Haloween Pennant P1160143

Halloween Pennant, (Donna).

.

Halloween Pennants IMG_9149 (2)

Halloween Pennants mating.

.

Halloween Pennants IMG_9131 (2)

Three’s a crowd.

.

Common Whitetail 2 closer better 1 090115 Prairie Oaks csb1

Common Whitetail, (Donna)

.

Not far from the dragonflies .   .   .

Spider grande 2 back view 1 090115 Prairie Oaks cp1

Garden Spider, (Donna)

.

P1040994

Garden Spider, (underside)

.

P1050014

Another view of the Big Darby as it runs through Prairie Oaks Metro Park.

.

A few birds that managed not to elude the camera’s lens.

IMG_9203 (2)

Immature House Finch

.

IMG_9177cuse (2)

Red-headed Woodpecker A rare sighting but a little too far away for a great picture.

.

Red-headed Woodpecker 2 closer 1 090115 Prairie Oaks cp1

Another view, (Donna)

.

IMG_9196 (2)

Ground squirrels beware! Across a park meadow a Red-tailed Hawk surveys it’s realm.

.

Bay-breasted Warbler IMG_9129 (2)

Bay-breasted Warbler

.

Just one more look at the river.

P1050008use

The Big Darby

.

Thanks for stopping by.

As Summer Goes On . . .

Photos often result from our time spent in nature but they are seldom the only reason we’re out there. Truth is, we just love being outdoors. Part of the fun is looking closely to see what each new day brings. Perhaps it’s a flower, butterfly, bird, or something else that appears unexpectedly.

.

Below is a pictorial ramble through things seen in the last few weeks in central Ohio that amazed or enchanted.

.

The summer flowers have really been coming through for us this year.

R P1040852c

Swamp Rose Mallow, O’Shaughnessy Reservoir

R Halberd-leaved Rose-Mallow IMG_5823

Halberd-leaved Rose-Mallow along water’s edge, Griggs Reservoir

IMG_5800

Monkey Face along Griggs Reservoir

IMG_5795

Trumpet Flower along Griggs Reservoir

IMG_5791-2

Checking out the Lizard’s tail, Griggs Reservoir

IMG_5788

A closer look.

.

While things are starting to dry out from an unusual amount of early summer rain, it continues to be a good year for fungi.

IMG_1219

Taking a close look at mushrooms in a neighbors lawn reveals unexpected beauty.

IMG_5734

White Jelly fungus, Griggs Park

IMG_5684

Chicken Mushroom, Griggs Park

.

It’s harder to find warblers now but other birds are filling in.

B IMG_1209 (2)

While kayak fishing on O’Shaughnessy Reservoir this immature Black-crowned Night Heron was spotted along the shore. A real treat!

 

B IMG_5774

Adult Black-crowned Night Heron, Griggs Reservoir.

Solitary IMG_9056

Solitary Sandpiper on mudflats, Paint Creek Reservoir

Phoebe 2 LR 2 with bug 2 closer 1 080415 paint creek   cp1

Eastern Phoebe with a snack, Paint Creek, (Donna)

IMG_9044

Killdeer on mud flats, Paint Creek

IMG_8977

Green Heron, O’Shaughnessy Reservoir

IMG_9003

Great Egret, O’Shaughnessy Reservoir

IMG_9004-2

Taking flight, O’Shaughnessy Reservoir

IMG_8744

Baby mallard, Griggs Reservoir

IMG_5693

Double Crested Cormorants in the middle of Griggs Reservoir

IMG_5687-2

Portrait of a Great Blue Heron, Griggs Reservoir.

.

At first we thought it might be a beaver.

IMG_9015

Muskrat, O’Shaughnessy Reservoir.

.

Insects continue to satisfy our curiosity.

IMG_9081

Black Swallowtail, Paint Creek

Puddling 5 better 2 080415 Paint Creek cp1

Eastern Tiger Swallowtails puddling, Paint Creek, (Donna)

IMG_9096

A closer look, Paint Creek

Blue-fronted Dancer 2 head on 1 good 1 080415 Paint Creek   cp1

Blue-fronted Dancer, Paint Creek, (Donna)

American Rubyspot 3 on stick 2 closer better 1 080415   Paint Creek cp1

American Rubyspot, Paint Creek, (Donna)

Stream Bluet and American Rubyspot 1 best 1 080415 Paint   Creek cp1

Stream Bluet and American Rubyspot , Paint Creek, (Donna)

PPowdered Dancer 4 LR 3 closer 1 080415 Paint Creek   cp1

Powdered Dancer, Paint Creek, (Donna)

IMG_1180

Ebony Jewelwing, Griggs Reservoir.

IMG_5804

Female Ebony Jewelwing, Griggs Reservoir

IMG_5806

Stream Bluets mating, Griggs Reservoir

IMG_1225

Cicada, front yard.

.

.   .   .   and it’s always nice to see turtles and snakes some of which were in unexpected locations due to recent high water.

IMG_8995-2

Painted Turtle, O’Shaughnessy Reservoir.

IMG_5724

Snapping Turtle, Scioto River just below Griggs Dam.

IMG_5720

Garter Snake, Scioto River just below Griggs Dam.

IMG_5715

Common Water Snake, Scioto River just below Griggs Dam.

.

Sometimes it’s just the place.

IMG_1170-2

Cove, Griggs Reservoir

P1040896

Paint Creek riffles, heading further upstream would have meant more dragging than paddling.

P1040879

Cliffs along Paint Creek.

P1040887

Lunch stop, Paint Creek

P1040869

It was very quiet as we paddled along the cliffs, Paint Creek Reservoir.

P1040859crop use

Looking north on Paint Creek Reservoir as cormorants enjoy their sunny perch.

P1040846-3

O’Shaughnessy Reservoir looking much more isolated than it actually is.

.

Thanks for stopping by.

quercuscommunity

Life after the Care Farm

Out For 30

Exploring the world, 30 days at a time.

Tootlepedal's Blog

A look at life in the borders

Photos by Donna

It's all about the jouney.....not the destination!

Israel's Good Name

Voyages and Experiences in Israel

Israel's Good Name

Voyages and Experiences in Israel

Nareszcie urlop

English & Polish TravelBlog / Poland, Europe, the World

Eloquent Nature by Gary Hart

Insight, information, and inspiration for the inquisitive nature photographer

gordoneaglesham

The Wildlife in Nature

Through Open Lens

Home of Lukas Kondraciuk Photography

Imagery of Light

Photography by Sheila Creighton

My Best Short Nature Poems

Ellen Grace Olinger

through the luminary lens

The sun is the great luminary of all life - Frank Lloyd Wright

talainsphotographyblog

Nature photography

Views From A Small Island

A photographic record of the everyday and the not so everyday life around the UK.

Mike Powell

My journey through photography

The Prairie Ecologist

Essays, photos, and discussion about prairie ecology, restoration, and management