Late Spring Celebration; A Warbler and Much More

Nature unfolds and reveals itself like a flower, first reluctantly and then with grace. Armed with just a little curiosity, looking with intention, and allowing yourself  to be in the moment and place, rewards one with new wonder. Seeing and appreciating more each time.

<<<>>>

In the past few days, still interested in finding warblers, we visited Prairie Oaks Metro Park and closer to home Griggs Reservoir Park in the hopes of seeing a few stragglers. With the exception of the Prothonotary, the warblers didn’t cooperate but fortunately other things did. Whether it’s warblers or “other things” we’re always amazed by the celebration of life this time of year and the beauty that’s often found in the ordinary. The pictures below were taken over just a few outings, typically involving walks of at least two or three miles, sometimes longer, as we search for birds, bugs, and plants. It is a source of continuous fascination that so much can be found so close to home in central Ohio.

.

A shaft of light finds grass along a stream, Prairie Oaks Metro Park.

<<<>>>

It’s always nice when “the reptiles” decide to join the cast.

Next to the path a turtle acts none to happy about our presence, Prairie Oak Metro Park.

A Bullfrog shows a nice profile, Prairie Oaks Metro Park, (Donna).

<<<>>>

Still in “warbler mode” on a recent outing, we weren’t prepared for all the insects we would see.

Familiar Bluet, Prairie Oaks Metro Park, (Donna).

Ebony Jewelwing Damselfly, Prairie Oaks Metro Park, (Donna).

Inch Worm, (Donna).

Daddy Longlegs, (Donna)

Spicebush Swallowtail

Silver Spotted Skipper, Prairie Oaks Metro Park.

A very common Cabbage White, Griggs Reservoir Park.

Painted Lady, Prairie Oaks Metro Park, (Donna).

Virginia Ctenucha, Prairie Oaks Metro Park.

Viceroy, Prairie Oaks Metro Park.

Eight-spotted Forester Moth, Prairie Oaks Metro Park, (Donna).

Large Lace-boarder Moth, Griggs Reservoir Park, (Donna).

Milkweed Beetle, Griggs Reservoir Park.

Silvery Checkerspot, Prairie Oaks Metro Park, (Donna).

Green Bee on Coneflower, Griggs Reservoir Park.

Hackberry Emperor, Griggs Reservoir Park, (Donna).

<<<>>>

Where there are bees and butterflies there will be wildflowers or maybe it’s the other way around.

Butterfly Weed, Griggs Reservoir Park.

In grassy areas and meadows English Plantain is everywhere, Griggs Reservoir Park is no exception.

Very small bees visit the very small flowers of the English Plantain.

Hairy Wild Petunia (Ruellia humilis), Griggs Reservoir Park.

Black-eyed Susans, Griggs Reservoir Park.

Thimbleweed, Griggs Reservoir Park.

Early Meadow Rue, Griggs Reservoir Park, (Donna).

Day Lily, Griggs Reservoir Park.

Goatsbeard, Griggs Reservoir Park.

Moth Mullein, Griggs Reservoir Park.

Chicory, Griggs Reservoir Park.

<<<>>>

While we were excited to see Prothonotary Warblers nesting so close to home there was no storage of other birds to fascinate.

We’d been seeing this nesting Prothonotary Warbler for a few weeks in Griggs Reservoir Park. We finally were able to get some pictures.

It must be nesting nearby because at one point it was observed taking food to it’s young.

Preening.

No spot is missed!

The Rose-breasted Grosbeak is not common this time of year in Griggs reservoir Park.

A Downy Woodpecker making effective use of it’s tail, Griggs Reservoir Park.

An adult Killdeer tries to get our attention, Prairie Oaks Metro Park.

It tries a little harder, something must be going on.

Sure enough!

A male Baltimore Oriole makes it’s presence known in Griggs Reservoir Park. It’s been a great year for these birds in the park.

This Northern Flicker, often seen in a fairly localized area, must have a nest nearby, Griggs Reservoir Park.

Numerous Catbirds continue to entertain in Griggs Reservoir Park.

A Mallard keeps an eye on us as we walk along the water in Griggs Reservoir Park.

<<<>>>

A stream benefits from recent rain in Prairie Oaks Metro Park.

.

Nature unfolds and reveals itself like a flower, first reluctantly and then with grace. May you be rewarded with new wonder, seeing and appreciating more each time.

Chipmunk, Griggs Reservoir Park.

.

Thanks for stopping by.

.

XXX

.

Should you wish prints from various posts may be purchased at Purchase a Photo. If you don’t find it on the link drop us a line.

 

 

 

 

 

It’s Spring and Love Is In The Air

In recent days we’ve made a number of trips to areas along Griggs Reservoir and the Scioto River not far from our home. It’s spring migration and the challenge is to see how many migrating birds we can spot right in our “neighborhood”. At some point we may change our emphasis and increase the number of trips we take to more distant birding locations, but for now we’re having fun concentrating on places close to home.

.

To date the most numerous warblers seen are the Palm and Yellow-rumped. While the Yellow-rumped is very common, with more subtle markings than many of it’s peers, I never tire of finding new beauty when I look at one. At Griggs Park the Baltimore Oriole is at the opposite end of the spectrum. Connecting trees with bright sunlit streaks of orange the males seem to be everywhere.  Should an oriole or other bird not be close by, it’s easy to find other things to appreciate this time of year.

The boardwalk at Kiwanis Riverway Park. One of our favorite birding spots. The water level was very high when this shot was taken.

.

When we arrive to photograph birds we sometimes find them “still getting ready”,

Male Baltimore Oriole, Griggs Park.

“Okay, I’m ready!”

“There’s just this one pesky feather that won’t stay in place,” Palm Warbler, Griggs Park.

“Okay, how do I look?”

.

some may be busy doing other things,

A female Baltimore Oriole appears to be trying to build a nest out of monofilament fishing line in Griggs Park. We try to pick up lost or discarded fishing line and tackle whenever we see it.

Robin on nest, Griggs Park.

Mother Mallard tries to keep track of her charges, Griggs Park.

.

while most are usually ready when we get there,

American Robin, Griggs Park.

 

Severely back lit, an illusive Black and White Warbler taxes the capabilities of the camera.

Take 2.

The Yellow Warbler is cute from any angle, Griggs Park.

Yellow-rumped Warbler, Griggs Park.

A better look at the unique crest on the Yellow-rumps head.

Male Bluebird, Griggs Park.

Female Bluebird, Kiwanis Riverway Park.

Chipping Sparrow, Griggs Park.

Downy Woodpecker, Griggs Park.

Red-bellied Woodpecker, Griggs Park.

House Wren, Griggs Park.

Tree Swallow, Kiwanis Riverway Park.

A Red-eyed Vireo ducts behind a small tree, Griggs Park.

Yellow-throated Warblers are often heard. Finding them is more difficult. Griggs Park.

It appears that this Chickadee has been spending entirely too much time with it’s Tufted Titmouse friends, Griggs Park.

Seeing this White-crowned Sparrow was a real treat, Griggs Park. “White-crowned Sparrows typically breed in the far north in open or shrubby habitats, including tundra, high alpine meadows, and forest edges. Patches of bare ground and grasses are important characteristics. During winter and on migration these birds frequent thickets, .   .   . “, from The Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

Black-throated blue Warbler, Kiwanis Riverway Park.

.

but a few are just trying to get away.

Yellow-rumped Warbler, Griggs Park.

.

Other birds were engaged in finding a find a dry perch, made all the more challenging by recent heavy rains.

In the company of friends a Great Blue Heron looks on as the very high Scioto River races by.

In recent days Great Egrets seem to be everywhere along both the reservoir and river, Griggs Park.

Out on the reservoir a Great Blue Heron floats by on a tree branch.

.

<<< >>>

.

Many flowers have undoubtedly benefitting from the recent rain.

Stumped again, the flower of a small unidentified flowering tree or bush. Is it a garden escapee?

Fleabane, Kiwanis Riverway Park.

The flower of the Tulip Tree. Native to eastern North America from southern Ontario and Illinois eastward to Massachusetts and Rhode Island and south to central Florida and Louisiana, Tulip Trees can grow to more than 160 ft in virgin cove forests of the Appalachian Mountains. (Wikipedia)

Non-native Butterweed, Kiwanis Riverway Park.

Large flowered Valerian, Kiwanis Riverway Park.

Hobblebush, Kiwanis Riverway Park

.

You never know what might be hiding next to a flower.

A large female Fishing Spider, Griggs Park.

.

Heading back to the car at the end of one outing, my sharp eyed wife spotted three Northern Water Snakes celebrating the season. The males are quite a bit smaller than the female. These snakes are fairly common along the river and reservoir. However, unlike the various species of turtles which always seem to be around, they aren’t often seen so it was a real treat to see them!

Large female with two smaller male Northern Water Snakes, Griggs Park. They mate from April through June and do not lay eggs like many other snakes. Instead, the mother carries the eggs inside her body and gives birth to free living young and may have as many as thirty at a time, but the average is eight. They are born between August and October. Mothers do not care for their young; as soon as they are born, they are on their own. (Wikipedia)

The males were in competition for the female’s affection.

The larger male seems to have won, at least momentarily.

A tangle of tails.

.

After missing shots of numerous fast moving warblers and the recent challenge when I tried to capture the Black and White, I’ve decided to upgrade my otherwise excellent Canon 60D camera body to a Canon 80D. For the time being the bird camera lens will continue be a Sigma 150-500mm. Future posts will reveal how well it all works out. Thanks for stopping by.

.

PS: As is often the case, Molly Cat sat watching intently as I finished this blog. I’m glad I’m not a mouse!

Molly Cat

XXX

.

Should you wish, prints from various posts may be purchased at Purchase a Photo. If you don’t find it on the link drop us a line.

 

 

First Snow Meditation

The time between the departure of the last fall color and the first snow is always hard.  Ohio’s cloudy late November skies don’t help.

.

It is true that even with the lack of snow cold weather can provide fascinating things to look at.

p1420542use

Ice patterns along the Big Darby, (Donna)

)))(((

However, given the recent brown grey landscape, todays light snow beckoned us to venture out and again wonder at the transformation.

p1140744use

Picnic table, Griggs Park.

p1140705use

With snow outlining shoreline branches the view across the reservoir was now quite different.

p1140701use

Boats on the opposite shore, Griggs Reservoir.

 

p1140682use

Mallards, even with snow on their backs, didn’t seem too bothered.

.

Recalling pictures taken a few days earlier it was easy to imagine that the birds were in a better mood without the cold wet snow.

p1140678use

Chickadee

p1420525use

Female Downy Woodpecker, Griggs Park, (Donna).

p1430089use

Black Ducks along the Scioto River, (Donna).

.

Except maybe for this guy.

p1430003use

Grumpy White-throated Sparrow, Griggs Park, (Donna)

.

We continued our walk along the Scioto River seeing and hearing nuthatches, kinglets, creepers, and kingfishers but mostly just enjoying the place.

p1140715use

Just below Griggs Dam

p1140717use

Looking south.

p1140719use

Water soon to be ice.

p1140725use

The snow clings to the trees.

p1140731use

A small shallow pond freezes over early.

p1140736use

Rocks which might have gone unnoticed before.

p1140734use

In the stillness the snow continues to fall.

.

Unlike an April snowfall a late November or early December first snow is always magic. It opens our eyes to a world whose subtle beauty had been forgotten and is now again new. Thanks for stopping by.

p1140693use

In the holiday spirit a bulb had been placed on a tree along the reservoir, Griggs Park.

***

Should you wish, various prints from this and other posts may be purchased at Purchase a Photo. and Donna’s 2017 Birds of Griggs Park calendar is available at Calendar.

The Bird That Thinks It’s a Mouse

At least that impression one gets watching a Winter Wren  foraging for food. These very small dark colored birds with a very pronounced turned up tail are hard to see much less photograph as they make their way around dense underbrush usually near water. In fact I don’t think we’ve ever seen one very far from water although that could be due to the fact that we spent a large amount of our time looking for birds near water along the Scioto River in Griggs Reservoir Park.

wp1420172

Winter Wren along the Scioto River, (Donna).

wp1420163use

Study 2, (Donna).

p1140525use

Study 3.

p1140515dfix

Study 4.

p1140531use

Winter Wren habitat along the Scioto River.

.

From the very small to very large, a Sycamore along the Scioto River. What could it tell us of this place if it could talk?

p1420112use

Sycamore along the Scioto, (Donna).

.

This time of year it’s always a joy when common birds entertain us. Not so easy to capture in their natural habitat away from feeders.

cp1140423fix

Carolina Chickadee, Griggs Park.

cp1420459fix

Carolina Chickadee, Griggs Park, (Donna).

timg_6663

Tufted Titmouse, Griggs Park.

timg_6669fix

Study 2.

.

While closer to the ground there is still a presence of green, in many areas overhead it’s a different story.

p1140436use2

November branches.

.

Other birds continue to make their presence known.

dimg_6683fix

A female Downy lets the chips fly, Griggs Park.

p1140433fix

A White-throated Sparrow plays hide and seek, Prairie Oaks Metro Park.

img_6690use

White-throated Sparrow, study 2, Griggs Park.

p1420073

Apparently one of this Red-bellied Woodpeckers favorite trees, Griggs Park, (Donna).

rimg_6654use

A Red-tailed Hawk waits patently for it’s next meal, Griggs Park.

p1140461use

Almost always heard before they’re seen this Carolina Wren was determined to get noticed, along the Scioto River below Griggs Dam.

p1140610use

Song Sparrow, Griggs Park.

p1140470uses

We were looking for the Winter Wren but some previously hard to fine Golden-crowned Kinglets kept getting in the way, along the Scioto below Griggs Dam.

p1140472uses

Take 2.

p1140577use

A noisy Northern Flicker also demanded to be noticed, Griggs Park.

p1140590use

This Dark-eyed Junco was acting like it might have hurt feelings if I didn’t take it’s picture, Griggs Park.

img_6710use

Goldfinch, winter plumage, Griggs Park.

p1420418

Wait, you’re not a bird!, Griggs Park, (Donna).

.

A fascinating and unexpected find during a recent walk along the Scioto River was this very nice example of a Horn Coral fossil. The fossil was about 4 inches long!

p1420453

Rugose corals, often called “horn corals”, because their form may resemble the horn of a cow or goat. This coral became extinct at or near the end of the Permian period, about 240 million years ago. It first appeared in the early Ordovician period and peaked during the Devonian. photo by Donna. Ref: http://fallsoftheohio.org/DevonianCorals.html

.

Up until just four days ago warm weather was allowing some of our insect friends to hang around but with this mornings temperature around 20F we don’t expect to see them again any time soon.

p1420027

So long until next spring! (Donna).

p1420138

Likewise! (Donna)

.

Given that it’s Thanksgiving week here in central Ohio the next bird we will be investigating will probably be a turkey. On that note we wish everyone a happy holiday. Thanks for stopping by.

 

p1420445

Milkweed seeds take flight, Griggs Park, (Donna).

.

Should you wish, various prints from this and other posts may be purchased at Purchase a Photo. and Donna’s 2017 Birds of Griggs Park calendar is available at Calendar.

Searching For Kinglets

For those of you that follow this blog you know that we spend a lot of time walking in one park near our home. Part of the fascination has been to see what we can discover in this one specific location throughout the year. As the seasons change, it’s often about what we don’t see as much as what we do. From our house the park is also the perfect distance for a long walk which adds to the overall satisfaction of the experience. Finally, without making too much work out of it, we also try to help keep the park free of cans, bottles and other litter which provides a sense of ownership and makes the place just that much more special.

img_2003use2

The leaves are mostly on the ground now in Griggs Park.

.

Having provided a rather circuitous introduction you’re probably wondering where this is going. Well it’s about the Kinglets! Several weeks ago we saw quite a few Golden and Ruby Crown Kinglets along the Scioto River below the Griggs Dam but since then nothing. Were had they gone? Had our timing since then just been bad? We were starting to wonder. Would we again see these little birds that do so much to brighten up late fall and winter in central Ohio?

.

In then a few days ago, in the company of Chickadees and Downy Woodpeckers, there they were.

img_6552use

Golden Crown Kinglet along the Scioto below Griggs Dam.

img_6584use

Take 2.

p1410845fix

Take 3, (Donna)

p1410876

Take 4, (Donna).

.

.   .   .  and not far away.

img_6560use

Downy Woodpecker (F), a common resident this time of year.

p1140383

A Red-bellied Woodpecker contrasts nicely with the fall color.

img_6526use

A male Cardinal in the afternoon sun puts a smile on our face.

img_6593use

Male Bluebird Griggs Park. They are easy to spot this time of year.

img_6600use

Dark Eyed Junco, a winter visitor from the north, Griggs Park.

p1140372use

Take 2.

p1410988

A Song Sparrow with attitude, (Donna).

.

Red-tailed Hawks are hard to miss this time of year.

img_6628use

Red-tailed Hawk, Griggs Park.

img_6613use

Take 2.

p1140354use

Take 3.

.

My wife was trying to figure out what this crow was doing.

p1410920

Crow playing with Northern Catalpa seed pod, (Donna)

p1410923

Take 2.

.

And as always there have been other things to notice.

img_6540use

A Fox Squirrel checks us out, Griggs Park.

p1140366

Stink Horn mushroom, Griggs Park, only this one example was found.

p1410892

Amazingly, after a number of below freezing nights, we continue to see butterflies, Griggs Park, (Donna).

p1140368

Not in the best shape but pretty amazing considering the time of year.

.

Donna tried her hand at capturing the often ignored shapes and designs of late fall.

p1410778use-copy

Take 1.

p1410807use-copy

Take 2.

p1410907use-copy

Take 3.

p1410948use

Take 4.

p1410950use

Take 5.

.

On future walks we hope the kinglets, along with their friends, will continue to charm and fascinate making this time of year just a little brighter. Thanks for stopping by.

 

p1420010

Sunset, Griggs Reservoir, (Donna).

.

Should you wish, various prints from this and other posts may be purchased at Purchase a Photo. and Donna’s 2017 Birds of Griggs Park calendar is available at Calendar.

 

Autumn’s Little Bit of This and That

At first I just thought it was a butterfly, catching a brightly colored object out of the corner of my eye as we finished a hike at Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park. Almost instantly my wife cried out, “look at that huge spider!” and as I spun around for a better look, the breezy day caused a large female Marbled Orbweaver to swing over my head in a return arc. It would put The Flying Wallendas to shame as it gracefully went about it’s work suspended by “high wires” that were at times invisible. By the end of a walk not many birds had been seen, certainly nothing to get real excited abound, so the spider was a special treat and served as another example in nature of what for us has become a season of a little bit of this and that.

img_1593c-2

A Marbled Orbweaver gathers it’s web for reuse, about an inch an a half across, Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park.

p1400689fix

Another look, the two black dots are it’s eyes, (Donna).

.

While our visit to Battelle Darby had been all about the spider a few days later and closer to home a bird we don’t see that often made an appearance.

p1140068fixbright

White-eyed Vireo, Griggs Park.

p1140100

Another look.

p1140114

Take three.

p1400832fix

My what white eyes you have, (Donna).

.

Just as we finished enjoying the White-eyed Vireo a Bald Eagle was seen circling high over head. Not an every day occurrence within the city limits of Columbus and having seen the eagle we were a lot more excited than the below picture can possibly express.

p1140133

Way too high for a good pic, Griggs Park.

.

and there were other birds:

p1400297

Yellow-rumped Warbler, Griggs Park, (Donna)

p1400497

Male Downy, Griggs Park, (Donna)

p1400845

Male Eastern Bluebird, Griggs Park, (Donna).

p1400868

Another view, (Donna)

.

Insects and other things:

p1140025fix

Bumblebee on Jerusalem Artichoke, one of the last wildflowers of fall, Griggs Park.

img_1580

There continue to be sightings of Eastern Commas, Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park

p1400568

Very small emergent fungi, Griggs Park, (Donna).

p1400640

Unidentified tree fungi or who nailed those shells to that tree? Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park, (Donna).

.

The Ohio autumn landscape near our home continued to charm:

 

p1130992fix

Tree roots along the Scioto, Griggs Park.

p1140012fix

Moss and leaves, Griggs Park.

p1140014

Autumn along the Scioto, Griggs Park.

p1140017fix

Fallen leaves along the Scioto below Griggs Dam.

.

So letting go of expectations in recent days nature really has been a wonderful little bit of this and that. Thanks for stopping by. Should you wish, various prints from this and other posts may be purchased at Purchase a Photo. and Donna’s 2017 Birds of Griggs Park calendar is available at Calendar.

A Tree Swallow and Some Friends

In the last few days the number of migrating and non-migrating birds seen by us and other birders in central Ohio has been incredible. We are trying to remember back to last year but nothing approaching the last few days comes to mind. Were we  just not paying attention? We’ve visited our usual areas along Griggs Reservoir, but also got over to Hoover Nature Preserve and adjacent areas at the north end of Hoover Reservoir as well as Glenn Echo Ravine in Clintonville. Wherever we went there were birds. Only a few of those seen are documented below either because they were a little too far away, moving around too much, or the light just wasn’t favorable for a picture. For more info on birds in central Ohio along with some wonderful pictures visit Central Ohio Birders Facebook page.

.

Some other notable birds seen but not photographed;  Hoover Nature Preserve north end of the lake: a number of Red-headed Woodpeckers, Wood Ducks, Yellow Warblers, Blue-Gray Gnatcatchers, Hoover Nature Preserve Meadows Area: American Redstarts, Nashville Warbler, Glen Echo Ravine: Great Crested Flycatcher, Black Headed Blue Warbler, Northern Parula Warbler, Black and White Warblers, Baltimore Oriole, Blue-Gray Gnatcatchers.

.

So here are some of the birds seen.

P1090808 (2)

Tree Swallow, boardwalk north end of Hoover Reservoir

Black-throated Green 2 best 2 050416 Glen Echo cp1

Black-throated Green Warbler, Glen Echo Ravine, (Donna)

P1090892 (2)

Black-throated Green Warbler, Glen Echo Ravine

P1090831

Rose Breasted Grosbeak, Hoover Nature Preserve, north end of Hoover Reservoir

Yellow Warbler 1 LL 1 050316 Hoover N cp1

Yellow Warbler, Hoover Nature Preserve north end of Hoover Reservoir, (Donna).

P1090845 (2)

Great Egrets, meadows area, Hoover Nature Preserve

P1090963bc (2)

Indigo Bunting, Glen Echo Ravine

P1090963 (2)

In the same tree, Glen Echo Ravine

P1090963ct (2)

Scarlet Tanager, Glen Echo Ravine

Waterthrush Northern 1 LR 1 best 1 050416 Glen Echo cp1

Northern Water thrush, Glenn Echo Ravine, (Donna)

IMG_1067 (2)

Baltimore Oriole, Scioto River below Griggs Dam.

IMG_1107 (2)

Catbird, Scioto River below Griggs Dam.

IMG_1149 (2)

Downy Woodpecker, Kiwanis River Way Park.

IMG_1169 (2)

Pileated Woodpecker, Kiwanis River Way Park

IMG_1119

Prothonotary Warbler, Scioto River below Griggs Dam.

 

.

If there wasn’t a bird to look at there were other things.

 

jack-in-the-pulpit 1 050416 Glen Echo cp1

Jack-in-the-pulpit, Glenn Echo Ravine, (Donna).

Orange tan fungi 1 best 1 050316 Hoover 3 cp1

Fungi, Hoover Nature Preserve, Meadows Area, (Donna)

Wild Geranium 6 Best 6 close-up 2 050416 Glen Echo cp1

Wild Geranium, Glenn Echo Ravine, (Donna).

Pearl Crescent 1 best 1 050316 Hoover 3 cp1

Pearl Crescent, Hoover Nature Preserve meadows area, (Donna).

 

P1090926

Mayapple, Glenn Echo Ravine.

Yellow Flowers with water backgrd 1 050416 Glen Echo cp1

Marsh Marigold, Glen Echo Ravine, (Donna).

P1090867dc

New leaves, Hoover Nature Preserve, Meadows Area.

.

In the back of our minds we know that one day not too far in the future the spring celebration will be over. It’s a good time to be in the moment.

P1090869bc

Wetland landscape, Hoover Nature Preserve, Meadows Area.

P1090864contrast

Wetland landscape, Hoover Nature Preserve, Meadows Area.

.

Thanks for stopping by.

Bob by Bird Mural 1 050416 Glen Echo csb1

Bird Mural, Glen Echo Ravine

.

XXX

quercuscommunity

Life on a Care Farm in Nottinghamshire

Out For 30

Exploring the world, 30 days at a time.

Tootlepedal's Blog

A look at life in the borders

Photos by Donna

It's all about the jouney.....not the destination!

Israel's Good Name

Voyages and Experiences in Israel

Israel's Good Name

Voyages and Experiences in Israel

Nareszcie urlop

English & Polish TravelBlog / Poland, Europe, the World

Eloquent Nature by Gary Hart

Insight, information, and inspiration for the inquisitive nature photographer

gordoneaglesham

The Wildlife in Nature

Through Open Lens

Home of Lukas Kondraciuk Photography

Imagery of Light

Photography by Sheila Creighton

My Best Short Nature Poems

Ellen Grace Olinger

through the luminary lens

The sun is the great luminary of all life - Frank Lloyd Wright

talainsphotographyblog

Nature photography

Views From A Small Island

A photographic record of the everyday and the not so everyday life around the UK.

Mike Powell

My journey through photography

The Prairie Ecologist

Essays, photos, and discussion about prairie ecology, restoration, and management