August Rain and Mushrooms

Recently, after several wet days, we decided to take a drive to one of our favorite central Ohio hiking destinations, Clear Creek Metro Park. It’s a park that many frequent when they’re getting in shape for more exotic destinations like the Appalachian Tail or Rocky Mountain National Park. The tails are that challenging.  In our case it was more about seeing mushrooms that we wouldn’t find in parks closer to home, but a beautiful rugged trial lined with ferns that winds its way through old growth Hemlock and oak with a trailhead sign that says something like, “Caution, unimproved trail, proceed at your own risk”, is always a plus. Being located at the southern edge of the last glacier’s advance, on land that has for the most part never been disturbed by farming, logging, or other human activities, has a lot to do with the parks beauty. To optimize our chance of seeing mushrooms we decided to use the Creekside Meadows Trail to access the Fern/Hemlock trail loop. Certainly not the longest hike in the park but given our propensity to stop a look at things it made for a good day’s outing.

Park Trail Map

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Just a short note about the cameras used during the hike. We consider ourselves nature lovers who enjoy capturing the beauty of what we see. Often our outings involve a canoe or long hikes over relatively rugged terrain. For this reason hauling a lot of equipment may not be possible or may take away from the experience of “being” in nature. Recently I’ve been experimenting with a Canon 80D Tamron 18-400 mm combo while my wife continues to rely on a Panasonic FZ200 superzoom for many of her insect and fungi shots. Overall I’m happy with the performance of the DSLR combo and it’s potential for more creative control. However, in the sunny day darkness of Clear Creek’s deep woods, with auto ISO limited to 3200, handheld shots were chancy at best and mostly disappointing. A tripod would have resolved the problem but toting it around as well as setting it up for most shots would have changed the flavor of the hike. On the other hand the FZ200 with its fast 2.8 lens, and auto ISO limited to 800, much more consistently provided usable pictures without the use of a tripod. Something that is good to know because while there is no right or wrong when it come to how we pursue photography it is important to ask yourself what it is you are trying to get from an experience before investing in equipment.

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Chanterelles:

Yellow-footed Chanterelle

Chanterelle, (Donna).

Chanterelle, (Donna).

White Chanterelle

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White Phlox

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Shelf like mushrooms:

Turkeytail, (Donna).

Another look.

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Fall Phlox

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Boletes:

Shaggy-stalked Bolete, (Donna)

Shaggy-stalked Bolete another example.

Two-colored Bolete, (Donna).

King Bolete

Unidentified bolete.

Unidentified bolete

Russula, (Donna).

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A small, yet to be identified, wildflower.

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Other mushrooms:

Destroying Angel, not a good selection for the dinner table!

The fascinating underside of a free gill mushroom, (Donna).

Yellow Tuning Fork

Orange Mycena

Very large emerging free gill mushroom

Further along.

.   .   .  still further.

Unidentified small mushrooms.

Clustered Coral

An unidentified veiled mushroom.

Appears to be a more mature example of the above mushroom.

Unidentified veiled mushroom.

Very tiny unidentified mushrooms

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Pinesap, a parasitic plant classified as a wildflower.

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Along the Creekside Meadows Trail near the end of our day a hiking companion spotted this tiny Ring-necked Snake. The first one we’ve ever seen during our outings.

Ring-necked Snake, (Donna).

Another look, (Donna).

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Finally, I must admit that we are on the steep part of the learning curve when it comes to mushrooms. Using the guides we have available a frustrating number remain unidentified.  Perhaps that is a good thing in the world of mushrooms because if you wrongly identify a mushroom it could be hazardous to your health!

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Thanks for stopping by.

A Festival of Fungi at Clear Creek Metro Park

With the amount of rain we’ve had recently it seemed like a great time to visit Clear Creek Metro Park to see what fungi might be making an appearance. The park is unique, located about fifty miles southeast of Columbus in an area where the last glaciers stopped their southward advance. It’s 5,300 acres of woods, sandstone cliffs, ravines, and creeks are home to hemlocks, oaks, and hickory. As we left Columbus we were hoping to discover some things not seen closer to home.

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It was still early when we arrived and everything was wet from a recent rain. The air was cool but the humidity was very high. Given these conditions, we were drenched in perspiration for most of our five mile hike, with glasses and viewfinders fogging up every time we attempted to take a photograph. On this particular day, it was the price of admission.

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Interestingly, the first thing seen was lichen growing on the roof  of a visitor information board not far from where we parked.

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British Soldier Lichen, red fruiting bodies are less than 1/8 inch across. It was the first we had seen in Ohio.

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Leaving the lichen, we began a rather steep assent into the woods and immediately started seeing fungi. This continued throughout our hike of the Creekside Meadows, Fern, and Cemetery Ridge trails. Seeing so many unfamiliar fungi, the challenge soon became one of trying to figure out we were looking at.

mush P1040479

Violet-gray Bolete

mush Two-colored Bolete maybe 3 072115 Clear Creek csb1

Another example, (Donna).

mush P1040484

More fully developed.

mush P1040469

Turkey Tail on a fallen log.

mush P1040466

Crowded Parchment

mush P1040490

Small purple Bolete. Colors appear to vary among the same species.

 

mush P1040451

Jellied False Coral

mush P1040445

Red-belted Polypore

 

mush P1040442

Unidentified

mush P1040440

Spores being released from a mushroom.

mush P1040432

Berkeley’s Polypore. One area of the woods was dotted with these. This one was about 6 inches across.

mush P1040422

Very large Lepiota mushroom (@12 inches tall)

mush P1040425

Another view.

mush Orange Coral 1 best 1 072115 Clear Creek cp1

Coral Mushroom

mush Chanterelle P1040514

Chanterelles

mush Chanterelle P1040522

Donna moving in for a close shot.

mush Chanterelle 2 trio 1 072115 Clear Creek cp1

Chanterelles, (Donna)

mush Burnt-orange Bolete 1 best 1 072115 Clear Creek cp1

Burnt-orange Bolete, (Donna)

Mushroom white tan  Clear Creek   cp1

Panther Mushroom, (Donna)

mush Tall Tan Toadstool Clear Creek cp1

Unidentified Amanita, (Donna)

mush Pink Polypore 1 best 1 072115 Clear Creek csb1

Pink Polypore, (Donna)

mush P1040663

Unidentified Mushroom

mush P1040662

Unidentified Mushrooms

mush P1040541

Tufted Collybia

mush P1040481

Another view.

mush P1040537

Apricot Jelly

mush P1040530

False Coral

mush P1040520

Rosy Russula Mushroom

mush P1040517

Powder-cap Amanita Mushroom

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As if all the fungi were not enough, wildflowers were also making their presence known.

flwr Spiderwort  Clear Creek   cp14

Spiderwort, (Donna)

flwr P1040667

Starry Campion

Indian Pipe 1 best 1 072115 Clear Creek cp1

Indian Pipe, (Donna)

flwr P1040545

Woodland Sunflower

flwr P1040460

Downey Rattlesnake-plantain

flwr P1040461

Downey Rattlesnake-plantain leaves.

flwr P1040413

Oswego Tea

flwr P1040414

A little further away.

flwr Downey Skullcap 1 072115 Clear Creek cp1

Downey Skullcap, (Donna)

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.   .   .   and while not flowers, pretty nonetheless.

flwr P1040532

A confused leaf!

flwr P1040421

Ferns were everywhere.

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Given that flowers and many other plants were in abundance, butterflies and moths were easy to spot.

butt P1040681

Pipevine Swallowtail

butt P1040672

Another view.

butt Great Spangled Fritillary 072115 Clear   Creek cp1

Great Spangled Fritillaries, (Donna)

butt great P1040699

Great Spangled Fritillary

butt Great P1040648

Great Spangled Fritillary

Hummingbird Moth P1040714

Hummingbird Moth Blur

Hummingbird Moth 1 LL 1 072115 Clear Creek cp1

Hummingbird Moth, (Donna)

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While not our main objective, we did hear a lot of birds and even managed to see a few.

bird P1040576

Hooded Warbler

bird P1040560

Titmouse

bird P1040769

Eastern Wood-pewee

bird P1040762

Another view.

bird P1040493

A Wood Thrush? refuses to cooperate.

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At the end of our hike, we were in awe of the things seen. Many were first’s for us in Ohio. It had been a magical day.

P1040666

Trail at Clear Creek Metro Park

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Thanks for stopping by.

 

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