Paddling for Prothonotaries

Prothonotary Warblers have been eluding us in the park close to home so we decided to put the canoe on top of the car and head to the Howard Rd Bridge launch site at north end of Alum Creek Reservoir. If the warbler wasn’t seen during the eight mile loop north around the lake and into the creek we would at least enjoy a good paddle and besides there would undoubtedly be other things to see.

Exploring a quiet cove in Alum Creek Reservoir, (Donna).

Friends join us, (Donna).

Heading up Alum Creek

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Before any warblers were sighted we were treated to nice views of Osprey.

There are a number of Ospreys nesting at the north end of Alum Creek Reservoir.

Taking flight, (Donna).

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Near noon we started to get hungry. Sometimes finding a pull-out for lunch can be a challenge.

Alum Creek was running high and muddy with most pull-outs under water.

 

A dry spot was finally located.

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Continuing to paddle and explore we finally found the warblers!

Prothonotary Warbler

Singing! (Donna).

Take 3 (Donna).

Take 4.

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A nice bonus were the numerous Green Herons seen along the wooded shoreline. Not as easy to spot as one might think, we were sometimes right on top of them before realizing they were there. At which point they would suddenly take flight, leaving us startled and with no picture.

Green Heron

Other times they seemed oblivious to our presence.

Take 2, (Donna).

Take 3. (Donna)

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With numerous flowering bushes, some overhanging the water, butterflies were an added bonus.

Spicebush Swallowtail with Tiger Swallowtail in the background.

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And there were wildflowers.

Chickweed.

Corn Salad.

Depford Pink, (Donna).

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No trip is complete without a turtle picture. This guy was perched on a submerged log and uncharacteristically calm as we moved closer.

Red-eared Slider, (Donna).

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As though it wanted it’s picture taken, a Northern Water Snake swam right up to the canoe.

Northern Water snake, (Donna).

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With high water and a good current, the downstream leg of the trip didn’t require much paddling.

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Sometimes we have such good fortune it’s hard to imagine what the next adventure will bring that can possibly compare but nature always seems to come through. Who knows, it may be a different look at something we’ve seen before or a totally new discovery.

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Should you be interested in nature photography from a small boat we offer a few thoughts:

1. Canoes are typically more difficult to handle and are more effected by wind than kayaks.

2. Since both the object being photographed and the boat may be moving, not to mention interferences from branches etc., don’t expect your success rate to be a high as when shooting on land.

3. Although we have never submerged a camera, if you are new to small boats it may be best to start out with a relatively inexpensive camera like a Panasonic FZ200 or 300 just in case everything goes swimming. The FZ200/300’s fast lens throughout the zoom range as well as it’s reasonable amount of zoom will provide a better chance of success. More zoom is of questionable value when trying to photograph erratic fast moving objects such as warblers from a small, somewhat unstable boat.

4. The ideal situation is to have a boat handler while you shoot which is the case when my wife and I go out.

5. If you have no choice but to go it alone, make sure you have a way to quickly stow your paddle because when a subject is sighted you’ll seldom have much time for the shot.

6. As far as the boat goes, a recreational kayak like a Wilderness Systems Pungo 120 or a 12-14 foot pack canoe like a Hornbeck would be a good choice for one person. A boat less than 12 feet long will be fine if you don’t plan on paddling far. A longer boat will be faster, track better, and will be better at maintaining speed through waves but typically will be a little harder to maneuver and may be effected more by the wind.

7. If you have any questions, drop us a line, we’ll be happy to provide any help we can.

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Thanks for stopping by.

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XXX

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Should you wish prints from various posts may be purchased at Purchase a Photo. If you don’t find it on the link drop us a line.

 

Enchanted Cedar Bog

It had been a while since our last visit to Cedar Bog. Only forty four miles from our home in Columbus it’s easy to reach on some of Ohio’s lovely back roads. Blessed with perfect weather we loaded cameras into our small roadster for a delightful day of open air motoring and nature. Cedar Bog Nature Preserve  contains plants and animals not typically found in most Ohio natural areas. One of the first things you’ll find out upon arrival is that it’s not really a bog, it’s a Fen.  At the end of our exploration we agreed that the highlight had been the Showy Lady’s Slippers but we had found the whole area enchanting and well worth another visit.

You are always on a boardwalk when exploring Cedar Bog.

A wet environment means fungi.

We were probably at the tail end of the Wild Columbine.

Showy Lady’s Slipper

Another view.

Woods as well as water.

Cicada, 17 year Locust, (Donna).

American Toad.

Common Yellowthroat.

Wait, I lost my balance!

Okay.

Red Admirals were out in force, (Donna)

Another view.

We saw several Broad-Headed Skinks along the boardwalk. They grow from six to 12 inches long and are the largest of Ohio’s lizards. The young have a bright blue tail. Large males become a uniform olive-brown with red coloration on the head. They are essentially a woodland inhabitant found only in several counties in the southern half of Ohio and are rare even there. (Ref Ohio Division of Wildlife)

Another view, (Donna).

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We would highly recommend a visit to Cedar Bog. This time of year the Showy Lady’s Slippers are in bloom and greatly contribute to the magic of the place. Cedar Bog is near Urbana and when we’re in the area one of our favorite places to refuel is Grimes Field Airport Café. It’s unique and worth checking out if for no other reason than a piece of one their great pies. Thanks for stopping by.

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XXX

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Should you wish prints from various posts may be purchased at Purchase a Photo. If you don’t find it on the link drop us a line.

Photos by Donna

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