The Earliest Central Ohio Wildflowers

Skunk Cabbage which can emerge through the snow in early March is followed closely by the arrival of Snow Trillium. In recent years we’ve missed the Skunk cabbage as we are busy exploring nature future south. More about that in future posts. Just a week or so after the Snow Trillium, a few other wildflowers, emerging through the dullness of last year’s fallen leaves, grace us with their beauty. An early awakening to the beauty that follows.

The Snow Trillium is localized, and not the common, in the Midwestern states of Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio.
The very tiny Harbinger of Spring.
The fragile flowers of the Bloodroot are here for a very short time.
Dutchman’s Breeches are fairly common in central Ohio and hang around quite a bit longer than the very fragile flower of the Bloodroot..
Cut-leaved Toothwort is a small woodland wildflower that is easy to miss.
Toadshade trillium is common woodland wildflower occurring in the eastern part of Kansas and Oklahoma, in the lower Midwest to the upper south, New York to North Carolina.
Virginia Bluebells are a common woodland wild flower in the Midwest and can be seen of a period of several days.

Everything has it’s time and there is no better example than the early spring wildflowers. In a few weeks as you walk through the woods don’t look for Dutchman’s Breeches but as if never to disappoint there will be other things to fascinate.

Thanks for stopping by.

2 Comments on “The Earliest Central Ohio Wildflowers

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