A Celebration of Color and Form, Capital Reef and Bryce Canyon NP

We were looking forward to cooler weather as we left Arches and Canyonlands on our way to Capitol Reef, and Bryce Canyon National Park . Several days of waking up at 4 AM to beat the heat, and sometimes the crowds, had taken it’s toll. In addition, shorter drives to trail heads and points of interest, as well as a shuttle bus at Bryce, promised a more relaxed pace.

***

Capitol Reef embraces a geological formation called the Waterpocket Fold which is a nearly 100-mile long warp in the Earth’s crust, a step-up in the rock layers. The most scenic portion is found near the Fremont River where one can see white domes of Navajo Sandstone and the park’s colorful cliffs. Three steps, each of which occurred over millions of years, created the captivating landscape: deposition, Colorado Plateau uplift, and finally erosion. The erosion that sculpted the current landscape occurred within the last 20 million years with the major canyon formation probably occurred between one and six million years ago. Putting this into perspective, the oldest human fossil is 2.8 million years old while at the other extreme some of the oldest surface rock in north America, between 2500 and 3800 million years old, can be found in the Canadian Shield.

As one hikes the park trails some rock looks as though it was just placed there yesterday.

The Grand Wash Trail.

Along Cohab Trail.

Shaded and sunlit rocks, a challenge for the photographer.

Indian Paintbrush.

Along the trail through the Grand Wash.

“Capitol” and a tree.

Petroglyphs and grass along RT 24 in the park.

More petroglyphs along Rt 24.

Bristlecone Pine.

Capitol Gorge, once the only east to west route through the park.

Chimney Rock near sunset.

Tree and sculpted sandstone.

The Reef.

***

Leaving Capitol Reef and travelling about 100 miles to Bryce Canyon takes one to a very different world. Situated along a high plateau at the top of an area known as the Grand Staircase, the park includes a series of natural amphitheaters and contains the earths largest concentration of irregular columns of rock (hoodoos). It’s geology is unique but along with sandstone formations the stretch the imagination the park is home to numerous beautiful wooded and meadow landscapes.

Along the rim trail, a lone pine looks down into the hoodoos.

Hiking down through “Wall Street” from Sunrise Pt.

Looking up.

Along the Swamp Canyon trail grass sparkles in the early morning sunlight.

A Limber Pine casts it’s shadow at the canyons edge along the Rim Trail.

Flowering Rabbit Bush contrasts with the colors of the rock.

Bristlecone Pine.

A view from the edge along the Rim Trail.

Juxtaposition.

Fallen tree, rock, and sky along the trail below Sunrise Pt.

Hoodoos frame a long dead Bristlecone Pine.

Looking up along the trail below Sunrise Pt.

Hanging on at the very edge.

Natural Bridge.

Along the Mossy Cave Trail.

View from the Bristlecone Trail loop.

.

As we explored the parks, and hiked the trails, we were always on the lookout for wildlife and we were usually not disappointed.

Desert Spiny Lazard, (Donna).

Black Phoebe, (Donna).

Connecticut Warbler, (Donna).

Young Short Eared Lizard, (Donna).

Hummingbird checks out a flower, (Donna).

Mountain Chickadee, (Donna).

Steller Jay, (Donna).

Eastern Fence Lizard, (Donna).

Weidemeyer’s Admiral, (Donna).

Black-throated Sparrow, an active an elusive bird, (Donna).

Golden-mantled Ground Squirrel, (Donna).

Utah Prairie Dogs had their “towns” not far from the Bryce Canyon NP Lodge. The Utah Prairie Dog is the western most of the five species that inhabit North America. Limited to the southwestern quarter of Utah, the Utah Prairie Dog has the most restricted range of all prairie dog species. (NPS), (Donna).

Clark’s Nutcracker, (Donna).

Sagebrush Lizard, (Donna).

Immature Western Bluebird, (Donna).

Mature Mountain Bluebird, (Donna).

Hedgerow Hairstreak, (Donna).

Melissa Blue, (Donna).

Rock Wren, (Donna).

 

.

As we wrap up our stay at Bryce, our westernmost destination, we look forward to a different type of adventure at Mesa Verde NP where we will travel back in time. Thanks for stopping by.

.

 

12 Comments on “A Celebration of Color and Form, Capital Reef and Bryce Canyon NP

  1. What a wonderful catalog of images, awakening my senses and my memory!! I remember Bryce as ethereal in its vastness and structure, and your shots reconfirm that impression. I have never been to Reef, though, and it looks quite amazing. Nothing like the landscapes of this part of the world to give perspective….and humility. Thank you for sharing your journey!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: