A Clifton Gorge Fungi Find

We were hoping for a little more autumn color when we decided to schedule a hike in The Clifton Gorge Nature Preserve but two days of wind and rain took care of that. Starting near the mill we were greeted with splashes of muted color from a few scattered young beech trees. The red of invasive burning bushes was also seen but most of the now faded leaves had found their final resting place along the trail.

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This 268-acre preserve protects one of the most spectacular dolomite and limestone gorges in the state. Registered as a National Natural Landmark in 1968, Clifton Gorge encompasses a 2-mile stretch of the Little Miami State and National Scenic River, just east of John Bryan State Park.

Geologically, it is an outstanding example of interglacial and post-glacial canyon cutting. At one point, the river funnels through a deep, narrow channel, which was apparently formed by the enlarging and connecting of a series of potholes in the resistant Silurian dolomite bedrock. In other sections of the gorge, cliff overhangs have broken off forming massive slump blocks scattered along the valley floor.

The shaded, north-facing slopes provide a cool, moist environment for northern species including hemlock, red baneberry, Canada yew, arbor-vitae and mountain maple. This is one of the most spectacular sites in the state for viewing spring wildflowers including the rare snow trillium”. (Ref: ODNR)

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No hiking distance records were set, and it wasn’t a great day to capture fall color, but my wife did spot some very interesting fungi.

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Along the gorge trail. (As always, you may click on any pic for a better look.)

The Little Miami, recent rain resulted in good flow through the gorge.

Oyster Mushrooms, (Donna).

In places the gorge is quite narrow.

Perhaps Golden Pholiota, (Donna).

At times it was a challenge to get the picture.

Further down the gorge the river widens.

Beech leaves appear to flow with the river. (This picture would have been much more effective with the camera mounted on a tripod using a slow shutter speed.)

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By far the most fascinating discovery was:

Fluted Bird’s Nest Fungi, (Donna).

Another view, (Donna).

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Hints of color.

A quiet spot along the river.

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It was a wonderful time spent enjoying nature with friends. A visit to Clifton Gorge never disappoints.

Beech leaves with the river far below.

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Thanks for stopping by.

11 Comments on “A Clifton Gorge Fungi Find

  1. The fluted birds nest fungi is awesome. Didn’t know there was such a thing!

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