No Expectations

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Walking in the wood’s morning stillness,

Click on any photo for a better view.

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on late autumn fallen leaves

that recent rain left damp with saturated color,


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as kinglets with their quiet sounds

teased

flitting from branch to branch

never pausing quite long enough,


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I found myself with no expectations

content to listen to the voice of the day.

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***

Thanks for stopping by.

Enchanted November Woods

A half an hour before, we were standing in a cold wind just below a dam that has created one of central Ohio’s larger reservoirs trying our best to spot, and perhaps photograph, the Black-legged Kittiwake that was reported in the area. A unique opportunity because it’s a gull not usually seen in these parts. We finally did get a very average binocular view of the bird, another one for my “life list”, but in the process managed to journey pretty far down the road to hypothermia. Now we were looking forward to a hike in the woods with the thought that it wouldn’t be windy and the modest exertion might be enough to warm us up.

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Char-Mar Ridge Park, is not far from the dam so it seemed like a good choice. The park is home to numerous species of large trees as well as a pond that usually contains waterfowl. A plus is that next to the pond is a nicely situated observation blind for undetected viewing. This time of the year finds most leaves, a significant portion of which are oak, on the forest floor as the bare branched sentinels, once their home, tower overhead. The lack of leaves on branches promotes a rather barren landscape but made it easy to spot a Pileated woodpecker just minutes into our walk. It insisted on maintaining its position between us and the sun foiling efforts to obtain a really good photo.

Pileated Woodpecker, all photos may be clicked on for a better view.

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Once in the park it was hard not to notice the uniform blanket of leaves. They accentuated the park’s large rocks and fallen trees giving the sense that one was walking through a sculptor garden.

Oak leaves on log.

Large glacial erratic.

Recent rains darkened fallen trees, further contrasting them with the leaves.

Fallen leaves and branches.

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While I was amusing myself with stumps and fallen trees my wife was doing her best to locate fascinating fungi.

A study of leaves, tree bark, and fungi.

Resinous Polypore, (Donna).

A type of spreading fungi, (Donna).

Lichen and jelly fungi, (Donna).

Common Split Gill just starting out, (Donna).

Colorful Turkeytail.

Perhaps young Cinnabar-red Polypore.

Another look, (Donna).

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It was just a short distance to the blind overlooking the pond and despite the fact that the resident Red Headed Woodpecker was not seen the time spent there did not disappoint. A neighborhood of usual suspects was more than happy to entertain us.

White Breasted Nuthatch, (Donna).

Another look.

Male Cardinal.

White-throated sparrow, (Donna).

Another look.

Tufted Titmouse, (Donna).

What are you looking at?

Downy Woodpecker

Take 2.

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There was also activity on the pond.

Male Hooded Merganser.

Male and female Gadwalls

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It is hard not to be enchanted when one finds color suspended in an otherwise drab gray landscape. Most leaves were down but those on the smaller beech trees hang on and even though their color is no match for the brilliant reds of a maple they did their best to supply color.

Color suspended among slender trees.

A closer look.

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Recent rains meant that some areas still contained “ponds” of standing water on and along the path creating a challenge for dry feet but also provided a unique “looking-glass” into the late autumn woods.

November reflection.

November reflection, black and white.

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November reflection 2.

November reflection 2, black and white .

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In the cold November woods there always is more going on than we know. We move too fast and miss much, wishing for warmer days.

Char-Mar Ridge Park.

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Thanks for stopping by.

The Wisdom of The Moment and Time Passing

Recently on a cold blustery day, after a storm blanketed the landscape with ice and snow, we found ourselves walking through the woods along a high ridge where for thousands of years people long since gone, had come with all their hopes, dreams, aspirations, and those they loved, to quarry flint, for arrow heads, knives, and other tools.

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Around now flooded quarry pits, in the magic of frozen crystalline beauty, it was hard not to sense their presence and hear their voices as they spoke the wisdom of the moment and time passing.

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Ice and snow, Flint Ridge State Park.

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Thanks for stopping by.

 

First Ice

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Today as we walked along the river,

the hard dry frozen ground

held wilted still green plants.

Out of the north

the wind had a bite

as fast-moving clouds

playing with the sun

and us

giving first

just a hint of warmth

then not.

While ducks swam in frigid air,

small birds hid,

and the river continued its flow

leaving near waters edge

the seasons calling card.

RSP

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****

A Clifton Gorge Fungi Find

We were hoping for a little more autumn color when we decided to schedule a hike in The Clifton Gorge Nature Preserve but two days of wind and rain took care of that. Starting near the mill we were greeted with splashes of muted color from a few scattered young beech trees. The red of invasive burning bushes was also seen but most of the now faded leaves had found their final resting place along the trail.

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This 268-acre preserve protects one of the most spectacular dolomite and limestone gorges in the state. Registered as a National Natural Landmark in 1968, Clifton Gorge encompasses a 2-mile stretch of the Little Miami State and National Scenic River, just east of John Bryan State Park.

Geologically, it is an outstanding example of interglacial and post-glacial canyon cutting. At one point, the river funnels through a deep, narrow channel, which was apparently formed by the enlarging and connecting of a series of potholes in the resistant Silurian dolomite bedrock. In other sections of the gorge, cliff overhangs have broken off forming massive slump blocks scattered along the valley floor.

The shaded, north-facing slopes provide a cool, moist environment for northern species including hemlock, red baneberry, Canada yew, arbor-vitae and mountain maple. This is one of the most spectacular sites in the state for viewing spring wildflowers including the rare snow trillium”. (Ref: ODNR)

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No hiking distance records were set, and it wasn’t a great day to capture fall color, but my wife did spot some very interesting fungi.

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Along the gorge trail. (As always, you may click on any pic for a better look.)

The Little Miami, recent rain resulted in good flow through the gorge.

Oyster Mushrooms, (Donna).

In places the gorge is quite narrow.

Perhaps Golden Pholiota, (Donna).

At times it was a challenge to get the picture.

Further down the gorge the river widens.

Beech leaves appear to flow with the river. (This picture would have been much more effective with the camera mounted on a tripod using a slow shutter speed.)

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By far the most fascinating discovery was:

Fluted Bird’s Nest Fungi, (Donna).

Another view, (Donna).

****

Hints of color.

A quiet spot along the river.

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It was a wonderful time spent enjoying nature with friends. A visit to Clifton Gorge never disappoints.

Beech leaves with the river far below.

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Thanks for stopping by.

An Autumn Bouquet

The image of a flower bouquet kept entering my mind as I thought about this post. Something enjoyed only briefly and then gone. Perhaps it’s the realization that today images are everywhere and the best we can hope for is a fleeting appreciation before they pass into time. So no iconic Ansel Adams images here, just glimpses of autumn in Ohio. If the reader soon forgets the images but is left with a positive feeling or inspiration the carries them into the day with a smile, we will smile.

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In no particular order, the photos were taken during the past week and are from a hike on a “new to us” trail along the western shore of Alum Creek Reservoir in Alum Creek State Park (AC), and also hikes in Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park (BD), Clear Creek Metro Park (CC) and Griggs Reservoir Park (GR), an easy to over look city park just mile a from our home. The fungi pictures are a reminder that even with most wildflowers gone until next year there is always something to discovery during a walk in the woods.

Beech leaves cast subtle shadows, CC.

Eyelash Cup, GR, (Donna). As with all images click on the photo for a closer look.

Fall color along the Big Darby, BD.

Serenity, GR.

Cracked-cap Polypore, BD, (Donna).

Windfall, CC.

Lemon Drops, BD (Donna).

Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park.

White-egg Birds Nest, AC, (Donna).

Cove, AC.

Unidentified yellow mushroom, CC, (Donna).

Dark jelly fungus, CC, (Donna).

Leaves, BD.

Unidentified fancy mushroom, BD, (Donna).

Road through Clear Creek Metro Park.

Creek, Griggs Reservoir Park.

Polypore, CC, (Donna).

Path through the woods, AC.

The beautiful underside of Common Split Gill, BD, (Donna).

The Big Darby, BD.

Bridge, AC.

Orange and yellow, BD.

Leaves and stump, AC.

Alum Creek Reservoir cove.

Tiny “parasols”, CC, (Donna).

Eastern Wahoo, BD.

Fence, BD.

Picnic table, GR.

Trees at waters edge, DB.

Leaves, AC

Shaggy Mane, BD

Leaves on fallen tree, AC

Solitary leaf, BD

Leaves along the shore of Alum Creek Reservoir.

Polypore, AC, (Donna).

Woods, AC

Path, DB.

****

Walking a wooded path

with little more than

the colors of an autumn day,

the earthen scent of fallen leaves

touched by rain,

and the sound of a solitary woodpecker,

I awoke in the richness

of the moment.

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Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park.

****

Thanks for stopping by.

 

 

Photos by Donna

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