An Early Autumn Paddle

Early autumn is one of our favorite times of the year. There are usually fewer people on the trails, rivers, and lakes as many have moved on to other things; football games, school, etc. September often has a period 0f sunny windless days making time spent in the canoe a pure joy. The landscape still mostly green is accented by the brilliant reds and yellows of a few trees determined to get a head start on fall making it all the more striking.

A small fish surfaces disturbing an early autumn reflection.

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Realizing that opportunities for comfortable paddling are starting to slip away, a few days ago we decided to paddle the north end Alum Creek Reservoir into Alum Creek with the hope of seeing fall warblers as we made our way along the shore.

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At first the sun struggled to burn off an early morning fog.

The fog begins to lift not long after we start paddling.

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But when it did .   .   .

The far shore erupts in color.

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A closer look revealed that the fog and the soft sunlight was giving a jewel like quality to spider webs too numerous to count.

Spider webs and autumn leaves.

Graceful designs.

Different colors.

What could I make with my own hands that would be any more beautiful?

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As we continued on close to shore, color frames the reservoir.

Just a few feet from shore offered some unique perspectives, (Donna).

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On this particular day the flowers seen were mostly those right along the shore and seemed to be thriving in that location.

Turtlehead

Sunflower

Beggars Ticks, very small flower.

False Daisy, also very small.

Broad-leaved Arrowhead.

A closer look.

Swamp Smartweed, (Donna).

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On the quiet surface the canoe seemed to glide forever.

Calm

Color, (Donna).

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Pullouts offer an opportunity to explore areas along the water and it usually doesn’t take my wife long to find interesting insects.

Gladiator Katydid, (Donna).

Weevil, Lixus iridis, a large weevil with a flat oval body, and a pointed shield. Completely covered in short hairs, yellow to brown, sometimes fading to grey. Thick legs and antennae. Habitat is wetland or close to water.

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Painted turtles greeted us as we paddled.

Unlike many turtles that sense our approach while we’re still quite far away resulting in a quick slide or plop into the water, Painted Turtles appear to enjoy having their picture taken, (Donna).

Do the turtles sense that the good times of summer are about to end? (Donna).

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While few warblers were seen and none were photographed, Ospreys were heard overhead, and we were fortunate to see some of the other usual suspects.

A Green Heron stalks it’s prey.

Time to straighten things up, Great Blue Heron.

We lost count of the number of Double-crested Cormorants seen, (Donna).

Belted Kingfisher, (Donna).

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After about four miles we arrive at a gravel bar on Alum Creek that usually marks the most northern point of our paddle unless we feel like dragging the canoe more than paddling it.

A lone rock marks the end of the paddle north and our lunch stop.

A great spot for lunch!

.   .   .   and a scenic pullout.

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Autumn reminds us, perhaps more than any other season, that nothing lasts. It reminds us to stop being passively entertained and instead to entertain and enrich ourselves, to venture out into disappointment and discovery, to experience being part of something larger, and to be alive.

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Thanks for stopping by.

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XXX

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Should you wish prints from various posts may be purchased at Purchase a Photo. If you don’t find it on the link drop us a line.

5 Comments on “An Early Autumn Paddle

  1. You have far more fall color than we do, which seems a bit strange. We’ve had a hot September though so maybe that’s why.
    That’s a great shot of the kingfisher and the swamp smartweed is beautiful. I’ve never seen it.

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