An Early Autumn Paddle

Early autumn is one of our favorite times of the year. There are usually fewer people on the trails, rivers, and lakes as many have moved on to other things; football games, school, etc. September often has a period 0f sunny windless days making time spent in the canoe a pure joy. The landscape still mostly green is accented by the brilliant reds and yellows of a few trees determined to get a head start on fall making it all the more striking.

A small fish surfaces disturbing an early autumn reflection.

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Realizing that opportunities for comfortable paddling are starting to slip away, a few days ago we decided to paddle the north end Alum Creek Reservoir into Alum Creek with the hope of seeing fall warblers as we made our way along the shore.

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At first the sun struggled to burn off an early morning fog.

The fog begins to lift not long after we start paddling.

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But when it did .   .   .

The far shore erupts in color.

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A closer look revealed that the fog and the soft sunlight was giving a jewel like quality to spider webs too numerous to count.

Spider webs and autumn leaves.

Graceful designs.

Different colors.

What could I make with my own hands that would be any more beautiful?

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As we continued on close to shore, color frames the reservoir.

Just a few feet from shore offered some unique perspectives, (Donna).

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On this particular day the flowers seen were mostly those right along the shore and seemed to be thriving in that location.

Turtlehead

Sunflower

Beggars Ticks, very small flower.

False Daisy, also very small.

Broad-leaved Arrowhead.

A closer look.

Swamp Smartweed, (Donna).

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On the quiet surface the canoe seemed to glide forever.

Calm

Color, (Donna).

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Pullouts offer an opportunity to explore areas along the water and it usually doesn’t take my wife long to find interesting insects.

Gladiator Katydid, (Donna).

Weevil, Lixus iridis, a large weevil with a flat oval body, and a pointed shield. Completely covered in short hairs, yellow to brown, sometimes fading to grey. Thick legs and antennae. Habitat is wetland or close to water.

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Painted turtles greeted us as we paddled.

Unlike many turtles that sense our approach while we’re still quite far away resulting in a quick slide or plop into the water, Painted Turtles appear to enjoy having their picture taken, (Donna).

Do the turtles sense that the good times of summer are about to end? (Donna).

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While few warblers were seen and none were photographed, Ospreys were heard overhead, and we were fortunate to see some of the other usual suspects.

A Green Heron stalks it’s prey.

Time to straighten things up, Great Blue Heron.

We lost count of the number of Double-crested Cormorants seen, (Donna).

Belted Kingfisher, (Donna).

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After about four miles we arrive at a gravel bar on Alum Creek that usually marks the most northern point of our paddle unless we feel like dragging the canoe more than paddling it.

A lone rock marks the end of the paddle north and our lunch stop.

A great spot for lunch!

.   .   .   and a scenic pullout.

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Autumn reminds us, perhaps more than any other season, that nothing lasts. It reminds us to stop being passively entertained and instead to entertain and enrich ourselves, to venture out into disappointment and discovery, to experience being part of something larger, and to be alive.

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Thanks for stopping by.

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XXX

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Should you wish prints from various posts may be purchased at Purchase a Photo. If you don’t find it on the link drop us a line.

Beauty Seen

Below are a series of photos taken over the past few days representing my humble attempt to capture the beauty of Griggs Reservoir Park near our home.

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Unless the sky is particularly interesting I prefer to shoot landscapes on overcast days or even on days where there’s off and on rain. This helps eliminate problematic shadows while at the same time controlling dynamic range. The one drawback to shooting under such conditions is that the pictures often come out of the camera looking rather “muddy”. To address this problem, acknowledging photographs seldom represent what is actually there but rather what the photographer wants to say, some post processing is necessary. Hopefully, a light touch yields a result that does not look over saturated or fake.

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I would never pass up a beautiful sunrise or sunset if the other elements needed to make a good photograph were there, but as I’ve gotten older I find myself increasingly drawn to the subtle rather than the dramatic. Unlike the dramatic, I’m suspicious that for many there must be a sense of connection to place or thing for beauty in its more subtle forms to be appreciated. Realizing that, I will certainly understand of these pictures don’t speak to others as much as they do to me.

Images are best appreciated if clicked on to enlarge. 

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Morning.

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Early autumn color.

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On the edge.

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Through the branches.

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Hanging on.

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Shoreline rocks.

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Yellow leaves.

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Pebbles and stones.

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Favorite stump.

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Calm.

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Canoe launch.

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Roots.

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Walking quietly

allowing oneself to be

in a wood or meadow

by a stream or a lake

beauty at first unnoticed

now seen.

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Thanks for stopping by.

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XXX

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Should you wish prints from various posts may be purchased at Purchase a Photo. If you don’t find it on the link drop us a line.

 

Hiking The North Carolina Mountains

Every couple of years we rendezvous with friends near Asheville, NC for a few days of hiking. Much of what is seen is different than that found in in central Ohio and that’s part of the area’s appeal. However, unlike central Ohio with it relatively flat terrain, the rugged ups and downs make the trails no walk in the woods. Because of this, as well as the length of some of the hikes, the serious cameras were left at home. Even so my wife got some excellent results with her Panasonic FZ200 while I explored the performance limits of the ZS50.

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Our base of operation is the Sourwood Inn which is convenient to Ashville and highly recommended should you find yourself in the area for a hiking vacation or just a quiet getaway. On our recent trip we hiked portions of the  Mountains-to-Sea Trail (MST), The Snowball Mountain Trail, Craggy Gardens Trail, and the Craggy Pinnacle Trail which are part of the Craggy Gardens Trails group.

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In past years we’ve seen plenty of fungi, moss, and lichen, and this year was no exception. Usually numerous butterflies are seen while hiking but this year we saw more along the Blue Ridge Parkway as we drove to the various trailheads which was not convenient for pictures. 

Along the Mountains-to-Sea Trail (MST) near Rattle Snake Lodge.

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Usually located not far off the trail, fungi, lichen, and moss captured our attention. Except for the low light  seeing and photographing it is relatively straight forward. However, once in possession of a photograph trying to identify it can be a humbling experience. Over the years we’ve seen some often enough that identification is straight forward. For most this is not the case so many of the ID’s should be taken as our best guess.

In the family of the boletes,  Mountains-to-Sea Trail (MST) near Rattle Snake Lodge.

Probably in the bolete family,  Mountains-to-Sea Trail (MST) near Rattle Snake Lodge.,

Honey Mushroom, ,  Mountains-to-Sea Trail (MST) near Rattle Snake Lodge.

A family of mushrooms, unidentified, Mountains-to-Sea Trail (MST) near Rattle Snake Lodge.

Powder-cap Amanita, Mountains-to-Sea Trail (MST) near Rattle Snake Lodge.

This mushroom appears to be past it’s prime (note mold) making identification difficult.

 

Tinder Polypore, Snowball Mountain Trail

Mushrooms and Lung Lichen keep each other company, Snowball Mountain Trail.

Old Man’s Beard lichen and leaves with a hint of autumn, Snowball Mountain Trail.

Turkey Tail, Snowball Mountain Trail.,

 

This group appear to be some type of chanterelle,  Mountains-to-Sea Trail (MST) near Rattle Snake Lodge.

Another mushroom group along a trail near the inn.

A member of the bolete family, Mountains-to-Sea Trail (MST) near Rattle Snake Lodge.

Rooted Polypore, along a trail near the inn.

Velvet Foot, Mountains-to-Sea Trail (MST) near Rattle Snake Lodge, (Donna).

White Coral, Snowball Mountain Trail.

Crown-tipped Coral along a trail near the inn.

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One of several overlooks on the Snowball Mountain Trail.

A short but steep descent to Hawkbill Rock with it’s beautiful vista, Snowball Mountain Trail.

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When we weren’t trying to figure out the fungi there were wildflowers to enjoy.

Pinesap,  Mountains-to-Sea Trail (MST) near Rattle Snake Lodge.

To late for Foam Flower so this one remains unidentified, Snowball Mountain Trail.

Beech-drops, a parasitic plant which grows and subsists on the roots of American beech, line portions of the Snowball Mountain Trail.

Indian Cucumber Root, Snowball Mountain Trail.

Downey Rattlesnake Plantain, Mountains-to-Sea Trail.

Snakeroot often bordered the trail, Craggy Gardens Trail.

Asters, Craggy Gardens Trail.

This is one of those cases where I was so fascinated with the structure of the flower that I forgot to photograph the leaves making identification almost impossible, Craggy Gardens Trail.

A cool morning made this lethargic bee easy to photograph on some trailside Goldenrod, Craggy Gardens Trail.

Turtlehead, Mountains-to-Sea Trail, (Donna).

Mountain Laurel, Snowball mountain Trail, (Donna).

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Overlook at Craggy Pinnacle.

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And butterflies:

Appalachian Brown, Mountains-to-Sea Trail (MST) near Rattle Snake Lodge, (Donna).

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, Mountains-to-Sea Trail (MST) near Rattle Snake Lodge, (Donna).

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Even a turtle:

Box Turtle, Mountain to Sea Trail near Rattlesnake Lodge, (Donna).

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But not as many birds as we would have liked:

Dark-eyed Junco, Craggy Pinnacle, (Donna). Seen in central Ohio only in late fall through early spring. However, due to the elevation which creates a climate similar to that occurring much further north, these birds are year round residents.

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A view along Craggy Gardens Trail.

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With it’s high elevation and harsh weather trees have to be tough to survive along the Pinnacle Trail.

Located along the Craggy Pinnacle Trail one wonders how many times this tree has been photographed.

Another view.

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For those in the eastern part of the country looking for a some beautiful mountain hiking, the area near Asheville, NC is highly recommended. The plus is that with a vibrant downtown, good restaurants, fascinating shops, and excellent galleries, Asheville is a great place to explore should you decide your legs need a rest day.

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Thanks for stopping by.

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XXX

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Should you wish prints from various posts may be purchased at Purchase a Photo. If you don’t find it on the link drop us a line.

 

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