Walking Not Running

When younger one of my greatest joys was running trails in the various area parks and experiencing the exhilaration as my body rose to the challenge of each new hill or greater distance. Blame it on the aches and pains of age, overuse, or maybe just wanting something more out of the experience, but at some point trail running wasn’t as enjoyable so I started to walk when in the woods. Sometimes I walked fast, but often a little slower not worrying as much about getting a “workout”. It wasn’t long before I started seeing things I hadn’t noticed before and often found myself stopping for a better look. At first, armed with only a little curiosity, I did so impatiently, wanting to keep moving. But gradually, the more I looked the more was noticed; relationships and interconnections, certain butterflies liked certain plants, some birds were usually found in the treetops, others on the ground, and some somewhere in between. Some birds passed through very briefly in spring and fall while others appeared to hang around all year.  There were unique spring, summer, and fall wildflowers. Nothing was forever, flowers faded, plants died, hawks ate squirrels, storms downed once admired stately trees, but through it all there was always new life.

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Aware of their interconnectedness, the plants, animals, and insects seen became more interesting, and then they, as well as the experience of being in nature, became almost magical. There was apparently a lot more going on than I ever realized when running. Slowly, rather than being “inner-directed” and worrying about “breathing and pulse rate”, I became “outer-directed”. A feeling of being part of something much bigger than myself, or even humankind, started to develop. Before long a feeling of oneness with “that bigger something” would embrace me while walking through the woods or paddling a lake or river. But also a heightened awareness arose that, like the “stately tree”, I was not here forever. I had been given a gift that allowed me, for a very brief moment of seemingly insignificant time, to look, listen, smell, and touch the wonder of it all.

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So on that note, the following pictures of things seen in nature over the last few days are offered as a merger celebration of this brief moment in time.

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The Baltimore Orioles have arrived to nest along the Scioto River and Griggs Reservoir.

Baltimore Oriole over the Scioto River, (Donna).

Male Baltimore Orioles along Griggs Reservoir.

 

Another lone male along the Scioto. The males are often seen chasing each other this time of year.

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Paddling on Griggs Reservoir it’s hard not to notice that the Wild Columbine is in bloom along the low but rocky cliffs of reservoir’s east shore.

Wild Columbine.

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Walking park paths other late spring wildflowers have also been seen.

Appendage Waterleaf, (Donna).

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Very common Yellow-rumped Warblers pass through Griggs Park heading north to Michigan or Canada to nest.

Male Yellow-rumped Warbler.

Another view.

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High in a Sycamore the first Great Crested Flycatcher of the year is seen. It will probably nest along Griggs Reservoir.

Great Crested Flycatcher. Note distinctive yellow underside.

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A whimsical year round resident, this Carolina Wren shows off it’s prize.

Carolina Wren

 

Another view.

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Numerous Palm Warblers are seen passing through Griggs Park as they also head further north.

Palm warblers are common in the spring and fall along Griggs Reservoir.

Another view.

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Also on it’s way further north a Nashville Warbler forages at the edge of the Scioto River. Not a bird we often see.

Nashville Warbler.

Another view, (Donna).

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As it searches for higher ground a Northern Water Snake is seen along the rain swollen Scioto River.

Northern Water Snake

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A “turtle family” doesn’t seem to mind the high water.

Red-eared Sliders along the Scioto, (Donna).

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Trying to locate a warbler we sometimes have a sense we’re being watched.

Peeking out.

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Sure enough!

Gray Squirrel

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We hope that in the past few days your adventures in nature have been as rewarding as ours. Thanks for stopping by.

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XXX

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Should you wish, prints from various posts may be purchased at Purchase a Photo.

 

7 Comments on “Walking Not Running

  1. I wish everyone could read this post and then go out and experience nature for themselves. They’d never regret it!
    You’ve reminded me to go and check the columbines.
    Great shot of the squirrel!

  2. Slowing down does have a wonderful effect on what you are able to see but after having my running career truncated by injury and now being old and creaky, I would happily trade a few nature insights for the ability to run again. Running, when you are really fit, just floating along, almost without touching the ground, is a feeling like no other.

    Still, I am glad that you have slowed to a walk because the results that you show to us are delightful. Thank you.

    • I remember the days when it felt like I could run for ever. My stride was so fluid my feet hardly impacted the ground. As you mentioned it was like floating. I feel blessed to have had the drive, discipline, and dedication to have experienced it!

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