A Butterfly Blast at Griggs Reservoir Park

Many of us have had the opportunity to visit a live butterfly exhibit at a local botanical garden and marvel at their beauty and diversity.  Seeing a large number of different species in that setting would not be a great accomplishment. But how about 12 species, more than 10 in just one three hour period, all at a park near your home in the middle of an Ohio city?

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That’s exactly what happened to us during a recent visit to Griggs Reservoir Park.

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Eastern Tiger Swallowtails were everywhere.

E P1040805crop

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail on button bush 1 072815 Griggs   s. csb1

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, (Donna)

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail 1 LL best 1 071415 Griggs south   cp1

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, (Donna)

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail on Downy False Foxglove 1 080215   griggs cp1

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, (Donna)

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Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, dark female

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The Question Mark butterfly was not quite as common.

Question Mark 2 wings full out 1 080215 Griggs cp1

Question Mark, (Donna)

Question Mark 3 LL 3 best 1 072815 Griggs s. cp1-2

Question Mark, (Donna)

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A common butterfly seldom seen with it’s wings spread.

Cabbage White 2 wings full out 1 080215 Griggs cp1

Cabbage White, (Donna)

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Zabulon Skipper, a very small butterfly.

Skipper zabulon and bee 072815 Griggs s.   cp1

Zabulon Skipper being photo bombed by a bee, (Donna)

Skipper zabulon  072815 Griggs s.   cp1

Zabulon Skipper on Button Bush, (Donna)

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The very small Peck’s Skipper.

Skipper Peck's on bull thistle 072815 Griggs s.   cp1

Peck’s Skipper on Bull Thistle, (Donna).

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Given the threats to the area in which they over winter in Mexico, we’re always excited when we see a Monarch.

Monarch 1 full out 1 best 1 072815 griggs s. cp1

Monarch, (Donna)

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Monarch Butterfly

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It’s been a great year for seeing the American Snout.

American Snout 2 LR by water 2 better 1 071415 Griggs   south cp1

American Snout, (Donna)

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Hackberry Emperors are common but beautiful nonetheless.

Hackberry Emperor 5 wings out on flower 1 080215 Griggs   cp1

Hackberry Emperor, (Donna)

Hackberry Emperor 3 LR 1 on log 1 best 1 080215 Griggs   cp1

Hackberry Emperor, (Donna)

 

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Hackberry Emperor

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Another common butterfly, the Clouded Sulphur.

Clouded Sulphur 1 looking up 1 080215 Griggs cp1

Clouded Sulphur, (Donna)

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Clouded Sulphur

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A Red-spotted Purple even made an appearance.

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A Red-spotted Purple strikes a nice pose.

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Red Admirals may have been the most common.

IMG_5744use-2

Red Admirals in the rain garden.

IMG_5756

Red Admiral

IMG_5759

Red Admiral

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We were pretty excited when we saw a Black Swallowtail.

Black Swallowtail 5 LL best 1 072815 griggs s. cp1

Male Black Swallowtail, (Donna)l

Black swallowtail female 2 looking up 1 080215 Griggs   cp1

Female black Swallowtail, (Donna)

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Other flying critters were also seen.

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A Song Sparrow overlooks one of the rain gardens at Griggs Park.

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Rain Garden Goldfinch

Hummingbird Moth 3 best 2 071415 Griggs south cp1

Hummingbird moths also like the rain gardens.

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Closer to home, our mail carrier spotted this Luna moth while making her rounds.

Luna Moth IMG_1628crop-2

Luna Moth, taken with the mail carriers cell phone.

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Perhaps the rain gardens, that were built to keep road runoff from flowing directly into the reservoir, are the reason for all the butterflies, we’re not sure as some butterflies were seen at other locations. Whatever the reason, we’ve been one of the beneficiaries.

IMG_5670fix

Rain Garden, Griggs Park

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Thanks for stopping by.

 

 

14 Comments on “A Butterfly Blast at Griggs Reservoir Park

      • Our butterflies are increasing. I just don’t have as many nectar sources as I used to. Will next year. We used to do a NABA (North America Butterfly Association) butterfly count south of our house. We did it for several year. It might be something you’d enjoy.

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