A Little North of Ohio, Part 3 of 3, Hiking in Algonquin

As mentioned in an earlier post, our time in Algonquin Provincial Park was split pretty much evenly between paddling and hiking. The trails we hiked, Beaver Pond, Mizzy Lake, Lookout, Spruce Bog Boardwalk, and Bat Lake  were all a short drive on Hwy 60 from our campsite at Pog Lake along the park’s southern edge.

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Most of the trails go through very biologically diverse areas with fascinating flowers, fungi and forest floor creatures. While the trails are not especially difficult, good hiking shoes, lightweight slacks and a long sleeve shirt, and insect repellent, especially in the early summer, will make the experience a lot more enjoyable. To fully appreciate these places it’s a good idea to allow enough time so you can really look around otherwise you’ll be missing most of what’s going on.

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Below is a record of some of the things we saw:

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On you way to hike there’s always the chance you may have to rescue something.

Rescuing a Snapper

Hwy 60 Snapper

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The trails were varied with the woods often opening up into some beautiful views.

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Mizzy Lake trail.

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Wetland, Mizzy Lake Trail

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Different types of fungi were everywhere.

mushroom family 1 062315 Mizzy Lake Trail cp1 csb1

Mushroom Family, (Donna)

Ling Chih P1030301

Unidentified Fungus

Finger Fungi P1030625

Finger Fungus

Cup Fungi P1030527

Cup Fungi

Butterscotch Mushroom family 1 062115 Algonquin cp1

Butterscotch Mushrooms, (Donna)

Red Mushroom 062115 Algonquin

Red Mushroom, (Donna)

yellow-orange fly agaric 062115 Algonquin   csb1

Yellow-orange Fly Agaric, (Donna)

Yellow tongue fungus 062315 Lake Mizzy Trail cp1

Swamp Beacons fungus, (Donna)

witches butter 062315 Algonquin cp1

Witches Butter, (Donna)

Sphagnum-bog Galerina 062315

Sphagnum-bog Galerina, (Donna)

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Ling Chih Fungus

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Slug on Comb Tooth Fungus

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Pinwheel Marasmius  Mushroom

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Unidentified shelf Fungus

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.   .   .  and lichen too!

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Lung Lichen

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Common Button Lichen

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Unidentified Lichen

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Pixie Cup Lichen

British Soldier Lichen 1 062315 Mizzy Lake Trail cp1

British Soldier Lichen, (Donna)

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By late June many of the orchids have already come and gone. However, we were fortunate to see a few.

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Lady slipper along the trail, Mizzy Lake Trail

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Lady Slipper, showing leaves.

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A nice group.

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There were other flowers and plants to fascinate.

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Blue Flag Iris

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Lilly Pads

Corn Lily P1030476

Corn Lily

Coralroot 062115 Alqonquin cp1

Coralroot, (Donna)

Common Wood-Sorrel 2 better 1 062015 Algonqun hike   cp1

Common Wood-Sorrel, (Donna)

Yellow Parasitic plants 1 062015 Algonquin csb1

Yellow Parasitic plants, (Donna)

Twinflower 1 062115 Algonquin cp1

Twinflower, (Donna)

Spiral Ferns 1 062015 Algonquin hike csb1

Spiral Ferns, (Donna)

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Moss fruiting bodies

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?

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Leaves

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Pale Laurel Fowers like very wet araes.

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Bunch Berries

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Hawkweed

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Pale Corydalis

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It doesn’t seem like you can go anywhere in Algonquin without seeing Sundew.

sun P1030617

Sundew

sun dews 2 better 1 062415 Costello Creek cp1

A closer look, (Donna)

sun P1030419use

Closer yet.

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We had high expectations of seeing and photographing warblers. Birds were heard, especially Winter Wrens, but because of the leaf cover few were seen (we did manage to see Magnolias, Northern Parulas, and Yellow-rumps)  but few were photographed.

Red-eyed Vireo 062415 Algonquin Pog Lake campground    cp1

Red-eyed Vireo, (Donna)

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Along the trail we were never far from the “handiwork” of beavers.

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Beaver dam, Mizzy Lake Trail

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Beaver dam, Beaver Pond Trail.

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.   .   .   and the beavers themselves.

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Beaver family, Mizzy Lake Trail.

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Moose are also fairly easy to spot in late June.

Moose P1040783

Bull Moose along Hwy 60, (Ben)

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We were always on the lookout for dragonflies, moths and butterflies. Sometimes they cooperated.

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail 2 on flower 1 062115 Algonquin   cp1

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, (Donna)

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Catching sunlight in a pine, a White Admiral catches our eye.

Common Wood-Nymph 1 062115 Algonquin cp1

Common Wood-Nymph, (Donna)

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Snail on the forest floor.

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With flowing water everywhere .   .   .

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Reflections, Bat Lake Trail

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Flowing towards a larger stream

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Water, moss, leaves, rocks

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The trails could be wet.

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Mizzy Lake Trail

Ben at Bat Lake boardwalk 1 062115 Algonquin cp1

Bat Lake Trail Boardwalk, (Donna)

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The toads and frogs didn’t seem to mind.

Toad Emily

American Toad, (Emily)

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Wood Frog

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Green Frog

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Waiting for lunch.

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If no flower, insect reptile amphibian or other creature caught our attention there was always the scenery.

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Pond, Mizzy Lake Trail

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Beaver Pond

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Hiking around Pog Lake

Bob on top of Lookout trail 062115 Algonquin csb1

Lookout Trail overlook, (Donna)

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Stream, Mizzy Lake Trail

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Fallen tree,

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Campsite, Pog lake

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Wetland, Spruce Bog Boardwalk

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Beaver lodge, Beaver Pond Trail

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Thanks for stopping by.

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Pog Lake

 

 

9 Comments on “A Little North of Ohio, Part 3 of 3, Hiking in Algonquin

  1. Wow! That was an incredible collections of photos! I may very well have to add the Algonquin area to my bucket list of places that I want to see.

  2. Great post. I especially love the lichen and fungi photos. I really like walking or paddling along the trails with the two of you. It’s wonderful to see the countryside through your eyes.

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