Spring Wonder at Griggs Reservoir

Spring is a wonderful time of year. It seems that nature is in it’s most generous mood. “New” arrives everyday whether it’s in the form of a bird, flower, or other creature. Places that may seem ordinary later in the year are magically transformed by this new life. Even for those of us that spend large amounts of time walking in the woods or paddling along rivers, this time each year is no less fascinating.  This is certainly the case for a special place to us, Griggs Reservoir and the Scioto River just below the dam, which is not far from our home. For those of you that follow this blog you know we write about this place often. Residents of central Ohio probably know where it is, for all others, it’s located right within the city limits of Columbus, Ohio. For us, this fact greatly contributes to the magic.

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In an attempt to document this magic, the photos below are a record of some things seen  over the last two weeks.

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 Common Red-breasted Mergansers along the Scioto River.

Common Mergansers 050615 Griggs south cp1-3

Can’t help but think these Red-breasted Mergansers (corrected per reader comment) should be further north by now, (Donna)

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The early spring wildflowers are gone but others have taken their place.

Dame's Rocket 2 cluster 1 050615 Griggs south cp1

Dame’s Rocket, Griggs Park, (Donna)

Appendaged Waterleaf 3 close-up 2 050615 Griggs south   cp1

Appendaged Waterleaf along the Scioto, (Donna)

Wild Stonecrop 2 best 1 051115 Griggs paddle cp1

Wild Stonecrop along the reservoir, (Donna)

Golden Alexander 3 close-up and dew drops 050615 Griggs   south cp1

Golden Alexander along the Scioto River, (Donna)

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.   .   .   and one of the more unique late spring wildflowers has appeared on the low cliffs along the reservoir.

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Wild Columbine along the reservoir

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Wild Columbine typically grows on vertical rock faces.

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A good selection of reptiles have also been observed.

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Red Eared Slider, Griggs Reservoir

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Northern Water Snake, Griggs Reservoir

Eastern P1020293 (2)

Eastern Spiny Soft Shell, Griggs Reservoir

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On one of our paddles, two deer look on as we glide by.

Deer mom and young buck 1 best 1 051115 Griggs paddle   cp1

Whitetail Deer along the shore, Griggs Reservoir, (Donna)

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Then there are the birds.

Tree Swallow 5 LL wing out a bit 2 051115 Griggs paddle   cp1

Tree Swallow, north end of Griggs Reservoir (Donna)

Prothonatary Warbler 4 better yet 2 050615 Griggs south   cp1

Prothonotary below the dam, (Donna)

Pro IMG_8615

Prothonotary, below the dam.

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Blue-gray Gnatcatchers continue to be a common sighting below the dam.

Baltimore Oriole 3 LR best ever 1 050615 Griggs   south cp1

Singing Baltimore Oriole (male) along the Scioto River below the dam, (Donna)

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Yellow-rumped Warbler, below the dam.

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Here till the fall Cedar Waxwings have finally made an appearance, Griggs Park.

IMG_5541uses

Cedar Waxwing

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There are mothers and fathers with babies.

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Canada Geese share the parenting responsibilities, Griggs Reservoir

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 But among the birds, the real treat is the return of mating pairs of Wood Ducks.

wood IMG_8581

Wood Ducks on the Scioto River below the dam.

wood P1020289 (2)

Wood Ducks, Griggs Reservoir

wood P1020216

The female Wood Duck has to have good parenting skills because she’s on her own, Griggs Reservoir cove.

wood P1020209

Not to long after mating the Male Wood Duck will be hard to find, Griggs Reservoir cove.

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.   .   .   and it’s all happening so close to our home! What’s happening close to yours?

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One of the coves popular with Wood Ducks on Griggs Reservoir. The rock faces in the background are a typical location for Wild Columbine.

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Hope you enjoyed and thanks for stopping by.

14 Comments on “Spring Wonder at Griggs Reservoir

  1. You got a nice shots.
    The combination of a canoe and LUMIX seem create a good tool for bird photographing. It works better than a 400 mm lens.
    Ba

    Date: Mon, 18 May 2015 10:42:08 +0000
    To: bahuynh@hotmail.com

    • We’re happy with our FZ200’s. I think the 2.8 lens throughout the zoom range really makes a difference. The EVF is also pretty good but will never be a good as an optical viewfinder.

  2. The Cedar Waxwing is stunning in it’s cloak of subtle color! Sandy

    >

  3. Your mergansers are late, but they’re Red-breasted, not Common. Common would have a white “chin-strap.”

    • Thanks James! I shot from the hip on that one which resulted in the misidentification. Not the first time. One day I’ll learn to double check.

  4. The shots of the wild columbine are excellent. I know how hard they can be to get a good photo of.
    I’m surprised you have dame’s rocket blooming already. Spring is sliding into summer quickly there.

  5. Love the shots of the Prothonotary warbler, they’ve escaped me so far. The cedar waxwings were very late returning here too, I think that many species of birds are taking their time going north because of how cold it’s been.

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