Six Miles in Six Degrees

It’s morning and as I write this the outside temperature is minus two degrees. The snow glistens from the rays of the sun, still low in the east. Amazingly a pair of Downey Woodpeckers, a Red-bellied Woodpecker, Nuthatches and Chickadees are at our feeders.  Watching them you would never guess the temperature.

Front Yard Chickidee

Front yard Chickadee, Donna

Red-bellied Woodpecker, Donna

Red-bellied Woodpecker, Donna

Red-bellied Woodpecker, Donna

Red-bellied Woodpecker, Donna

Goldfinch

Goldfinch, Donna

Song Sparrow, Donna

Song Sparrow, Donna

It’s been very cold for two or three days but yesterday we ventured out. It was a bit of an experiment to see how much we would enjoy a long hike in very cold and somewhat windy conditions. We bundled up, covered all exposed skin, put our Canon SX260’s on lanyards next to our bodies and headed out.

Along the river, even with the current, shoreline ice was slowly forming. A light dusting of snow provided a canvas for the tracks of various creatures that call the river home.

Geese Tracks along the Scioto

Geese Tracks along the Scioto

Frozen Shore along the Scioto

Frozen shore along the Scioto

Mink and duck tracks along the Scioto

Mink and Mallard tracks along the Scioto

Tracks along the Scioto

Mallard tracks along the Scioto

With the reservoir solidly frozen the river offers the only refuge for waterfowl. Looking at them made me feel even colder but then I realized that the water was almost thirty degrees warmer than the air. Maybe the birds were on to something!

Waterfowl on the Scioto below Griggs Dam

Waterfowl on the Scioto below Griggs Dam

Hop-hop, look for a nut.

Hop-hop, look for a nut.

Hoover Park Ice

Hoover Park Ice

8 Comments on “Six Miles in Six Degrees

  1. You and Donna captured many beautiful photos despite the cold!

    You’re right about the water being warmer than the air, when I used to fish for winter steelhead, I would find either a hole to stand in, or bend my legs to keep as much of me under the water as I could. That’s also why you can often see mist rising from the water on very cold days.

  2. Great shots! Thank you for bringing these wonderful sights to me without having to venture out in that cold! 🙂

  3. It’s so interesting that the birds stay alive when the temps are so frigid, isn’t it? Is Donna the photographer? I kept wondering in the beginning of the post if it was a species of chickadee. *grin*

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