Treasures and Trash

Often we decide to do an urban hike which takes us along the eastern shoreline of  Griggs. The urban hike, about a six-mile loop in our case, reflects our desire to get some exercise without getting in the car.  Being close to Griggs provides a chance to observe wildlife as well as the various plants growing along the reservoir. A small pair of binoculars as well as a superzoom camera are usually part of our equipment.

The first of November is not the time of year one expects to see a lot, but we hoped for some interesting waterfowl and maybe of few woodpeckers. Given the recent cold weather, we were surprised to still see Sunflowers, Black-eyed Susans, and Chicory. All of which looked a little tired but we marveled at their resiliency.  Along the reservoir, taking closer looks at flowers invariably results in seeing discarded bottles and cans. A decent amount of time is spent picking up these items, but we seem to always be rewarded with a new flower or bird during our efforts. Some times it’s as though the birds know what we’re doing and come around as an act of appreciation.

We observed how plants, such as Common Mullien, look very different in autumn without their flowering stalks but very much standing out against the fallen leaves. Along with more wildflowers than expected, we did see a few birds; Kingfishers, Great Blue Herons, Cedar Wax Wings, Yellow-rumped Warblers, Downy and Red Belly Woodpeckers, Tufted Tittmouse and Chickadees.

It was a good walk!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

.

Thanks for stopping by.

2 Comments on “Treasures and Trash

  1. Bob,
    I enjoy your prose and pictures. Trying to figure out what the reddish berries and leaves are…if it’s a bush, do you think it was Bush Honeysuckle or Climbing Nightshade. If it is a tree, Pin Cherry?
    We’ve had an irruption of Evening Grosbeaks up here. My first time seeing them.
    Take care,
    — Lou

    • I found out that the red leaves and berries belong to Burning Bush which isnative to central China and Korea. Itoccasionally escapes from the ornamental plantingsin Ohio into neglected urban and rural areas by way of its seed production.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: